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Adding reverb to hi-fi



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 5th 07, 10:36 PM posted to uk.rec.audio,rec.music.classical.recordings,rec.audio.opinion,alt.music.home-studio,rec.audio.pro
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Posts: 2
Default Adding reverb to hi-fi

Has anybody tried using a studio reverb unit, or other processors,
with a hi-fi system? I have found some recordings, especially
classical ones, are a bit dry, which is why I'm thinking of trying it.

www.studiospares.com

have a selection at reasonable prices, which units has anyone used
here?

Some models have a digital input, which could be used with a CD
player's digital output.

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  #2  
Old July 5th 07, 10:42 PM posted to uk.rec.audio,rec.music.classical.recordings,rec.audio.opinion,alt.music.home-studio,rec.audio.pro
ansermetniac
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Posts: 66
Default Adding reverb to hi-fi

On Thu, 05 Jul 2007 14:36:49 -0700,
wrote:

>Has anybody tried using a studio reverb unit, or other processors,
>with a hi-fi system? I have found some recordings, especially
>classical ones, are a bit dry, which is why I'm thinking of trying it.
>
>
www.studiospares.com
>
>have a selection at reasonable prices, which units has anyone used
>here?
>
>Some models have a digital input, which could be used with a CD
>player's digital output.



I added reverb to a recording once. Then I got well and never did it
again

Abbedd
  #3  
Old July 5th 07, 10:49 PM posted to uk.rec.audio,rec.music.classical.recordings,rec.audio.opinion,alt.music.home-studio,rec.audio.pro
William Sommerwerck
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Posts: 4,607
Default Adding reverb to hi-fi

"That's too much echo... echo... echo... Turn it off... off.. off..." --
Stan Freberg, "Heartbreak Hotel".

Twenty years ago, JVC and Yamaha made consumer reverb units whose programs
were modeled after specific churches, concert halls, and other performance
venues. If you're trying to produce a natural sense of reverbererberation,
this sort of device is what you want.

You should be looking for a Yamaha DSP-1, DSP-3000, JVC XP-A1000, XP-A1010.
I don't remember if the DSP-1 has a digital input; the other models do. The
DSP-1 requires its remote control and is useless without it. The others can
be operated from their front panels but it's a bit clumsy and inconvenient
to do so.

All offer four outputs, two rear and two side. The programs are adjustable,
to match the sound of the synthesized reverb to the ambience of the
recording.

They sometimes show up on eBay. The Yamaha DSP-1 is fairly common, the
others less so. I recently bought a JVC XP-A1010 as a backup to the XP-A1000
I already own. (I also have a Yamaha DSP-3000 and Lexicon CP-3plus.)

You should always run the ambience through added speakers. You should
_never_ mix it with the original. It screws up the sound quite badly.


  #4  
Old July 5th 07, 10:51 PM posted to uk.rec.audio,rec.music.classical.recordings,rec.audio.opinion,alt.music.home-studio,rec.audio.pro
William Sommerwerck
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Posts: 4,607
Default Adding reverb to hi-fi

> I added reverb to a recording once. Then I got well
> and never did it again.


There is a difference to adding to the recording, and playing it through
additional speakers. A huge difference.


  #5  
Old July 5th 07, 11:01 PM posted to uk.rec.audio,rec.music.classical.recordings,rec.audio.opinion,alt.music.home-studio,rec.audio.pro
Scott Dorsey
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Posts: 14,587
Default Adding reverb to hi-fi

> wrote:
>Has anybody tried using a studio reverb unit, or other processors,
>with a hi-fi system? I have found some recordings, especially
>classical ones, are a bit dry, which is why I'm thinking of trying it.


This was very popular in the sixties and seventies, and there used to be
lots of commercial boxes like the Fisher Spacexpander that were designed
for the job back then. They all.. sounded pretty awful.

>www.studiospares.com
>
>have a selection at reasonable prices, which units has anyone used
>here?
>
>Some models have a digital input, which could be used with a CD
>player's digital output.


I would tend to recommend something like the Sony DPS V-77, if your goal
is to have digital ins and outs and reproduce a realistic room sound. But
I suspect that you will be apt to go overboard on the effect if you are not
very, very careful. And I fear that you won't be fulfilling the wishes of
the original producers either. If they made the recordings very dry, they
must have done it for a reason, and that may tell you something about what
the artist was aiming for.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
  #6  
Old July 6th 07, 12:13 AM posted to uk.rec.audio,rec.music.classical.recordings,rec.audio.opinion,alt.music.home-studio,rec.audio.pro
JP
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Posts: 31
Default Adding reverb to hi-fi

On Fri, 06 Jul 2007 00:36:49 +0300, > wrote:

> Has anybody tried using a studio reverb unit, or other processors,
> with a hi-fi system? I have found some recordings, especially
> classical ones, are a bit dry, which is why I'm thinking of trying it.
>
> www.studiospares.com
>
> have a selection at reasonable prices, which units has anyone used
> here?
>
> Some models have a digital input, which could be used with a CD
> player's digital output.
>


if you'd like it more wet then why not. From Studiospares offerings I'd
pick TC M One.

-JP

--
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  #7  
Old July 6th 07, 12:20 AM posted to uk.rec.audio,rec.music.classical.recordings,rec.audio.opinion,alt.music.home-studio,rec.audio.pro
Mogens V.
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Posts: 375
Default Adding reverb to hi-fi

Scott Dorsey wrote:
> > wrote:
>
>>Has anybody tried using a studio reverb unit, or other processors,
>>with a hi-fi system? I have found some recordings, especially
>>classical ones, are a bit dry, which is why I'm thinking of trying it.

>
>
> This was very popular in the sixties and seventies, and there used to be
> lots of commercial boxes like the Fisher Spacexpander that were designed
> for the job back then. They all.. sounded pretty awful.
>
>
>>www.studiospares.com
>>
>>have a selection at reasonable prices, which units has anyone used
>>here?
>>
>>Some models have a digital input, which could be used with a CD
>>player's digital output.

>
>
> I would tend to recommend something like the Sony DPS V-77, if your goal
> is to have digital ins and outs and reproduce a realistic room sound. But
> I suspect that you will be apt to go overboard on the effect if you are not
> very, very careful. And I fear that you won't be fulfilling the wishes of
> the original producers either. If they made the recordings very dry, they
> must have done it for a reason, and that may tell you something about what
> the artist was aiming for.


Maybe the OP was thinking about a dry sound in basic two-speaker stereo,
and have a carefully crafted limited reverberated sound from the back
speakers only, attempting to (try to) reproduce some room/ambiance.


Wonder just how many NG's need to know about this, though...

--
Kind regards,
Mogens V.

  #8  
Old July 6th 07, 12:35 AM posted to uk.rec.audio,rec.music.classical.recordings,rec.audio.opinion,alt.music.home-studio,rec.audio.pro
ansermetniac
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Posts: 66
Default Adding reverb to hi-fi

On Fri, 06 Jul 2007 01:20:54 +0200, "Mogens V."
> wrote:

>Scott Dorsey wrote:
>> > wrote:
>>
>>>Has anybody tried using a studio reverb unit, or other processors,
>>>with a hi-fi system? I have found some recordings, especially
>>>classical ones, are a bit dry, which is why I'm thinking of trying it.

>>
>>
>> This was very popular in the sixties and seventies, and there used to be
>> lots of commercial boxes like the Fisher Spacexpander that were designed
>> for the job back then. They all.. sounded pretty awful.
>>
>>
>>>www.studiospares.com
>>>
>>>have a selection at reasonable prices, which units has anyone used
>>>here?
>>>
>>>Some models have a digital input, which could be used with a CD
>>>player's digital output.

>>
>>
>> I would tend to recommend something like the Sony DPS V-77, if your goal
>> is to have digital ins and outs and reproduce a realistic room sound. But
>> I suspect that you will be apt to go overboard on the effect if you are not
>> very, very careful. And I fear that you won't be fulfilling the wishes of
>> the original producers either. If they made the recordings very dry, they
>> must have done it for a reason, and that may tell you something about what
>> the artist was aiming for.

>
>Maybe the OP was thinking about a dry sound in basic two-speaker stereo,
>and have a carefully crafted limited reverberated sound from the back
>speakers only, attempting to (try to) reproduce some room/ambiance.
>
>
>Wonder just how many NG's need to know about this, though...


I think the op is a shill for the linked dealer


Abbedd

  #9  
Old July 6th 07, 12:47 AM posted to uk.rec.audio,rec.music.classical.recordings,rec.audio.opinion,alt.music.home-studio,rec.audio.pro
William Sommerwerck
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Posts: 4,607
Default Adding reverb to hi-fi

I don't like to disagree with Scott, who's generally correct. But there's a
lot more to ambience synthesis than the Fisher SpaceXpander.

There are products that are specifically designed for home use, and "sound
good". Please read my previous posting.

As for ansermetniac's remarks... As he suggests, it's almost always wrong --
both acoustically and aesthetically -- to mix ambience into a recording,
even a dry one.

But that's not what these devices do. They present the ambience through side
and rear speakers, and the results are quite, quite different. You should
hear what happens to mono recordings when a bit of stereo ambience is added
to the room. The improvement is drastic.


  #10  
Old July 6th 07, 10:19 AM posted to uk.rec.audio,rec.music.classical.recordings,rec.audio.opinion,alt.music.home-studio,rec.audio.pro
Mogens V.
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Posts: 375
Default Adding reverb to hi-fi

ansermetniac wrote:
> On Fri, 06 Jul 2007 01:20:54 +0200, "Mogens V."
> > wrote:
>
>>Wonder just how many NG's need to know about this, though...

>
>
> I think the op is a shill for the linked dealer


Oh well, maybe, so used to vendor/dealer links I missed it.
Whatever, sometimes some useful knowlege comes out of such posts.

--
Kind regards,
Mogens V.

 




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