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Ripping Vinyl to the computer?



 
 
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  #1  
Old November 27th 05, 01:11 PM posted to rec.audio.pro
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Default Ripping Vinyl to the computer?

I've got a bunch of old LP's that I want to rip into either MP3, or WAV
format on my computer. I'm using XP pro, and an onboard sound card. No sound
editing software other than MS sound recorder, which sucks...
What software would be good for doing what I want to do? I don't need some
expensive package, just something that will work.

Thanks,
--
Rich


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  #2  
Old November 27th 05, 01:26 PM posted to rec.audio.pro
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Default Ripping Vinyl to the computer?


CyberSurfer wrote:
> I've got a bunch of old LP's that I want to rip into either MP3, or WAV
> format on my computer. I'm using XP pro, and an onboard sound card. No sound
> editing software other than MS sound recorder, which sucks...
> What software would be good for doing what I want to do?


Well, first of all, the term "rip" suggests file transfer, and there
are no files to transfer on an LP. You have to play the record and
record it in real time. To answer your actual question, I'd recommend
Audacity. It's free for the downloading and it works well. Let your
fingers do the walking.

Now, you need a way to play the records, and you need a way to get a
line level signal into your sound card. This requires a turntable and
some sort of amplifier with RIAA equalization. The cheap solution, if
you don't have any of that, is to buy a turntable and a receiver cheap
at a thrift shop or yard sale. A better solution is to get a high
quality turntable and RIAA preamplifer. The quality of your vinyl
playback will be the most significant link in the chain. Unless you're
willing to spend several hundred dollars it won't be better than
whatever sound card you have so you don't have to worry about replacing
your computer's audio hardware yet.

I will warn you, though, that it's a very time consuming process.
Figure on at least two hours per disk unless you want to do a real
slapdash job. Will you live long eough to transfer your collection? Is
it really worth the time? Or are you just looking at picking out a few
favorite albums?

  #3  
Old November 27th 05, 01:35 PM posted to rec.audio.pro
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Default Ripping Vinyl to the computer?

Recently, in annother NG, a guy turned me on to Audacity. I have a good
version of Adobe Audition but went to check it out anyway. found it
here...http://audacity.sourceforge.net/ worked real nice when I tested it.
Of course when you do digitize those old albums you are going to want to
clean up the hiss, snaps and cracks. I like my commercial copy of Audition
but won't be a salesman for them here as I am sure there are other freeware
proggies out there that work just as good.
"CyberSurfer" > wrote in message
...
> I've got a bunch of old LP's that I want to rip into either MP3, or WAV
> format on my computer. I'm using XP pro, and an onboard sound card. No
> sound editing software other than MS sound recorder, which sucks...
> What software would be good for doing what I want to do? I don't need some
> expensive package, just something that will work.
>
> Thanks,
> --
> Rich
>



  #4  
Old November 27th 05, 01:47 PM posted to rec.audio.pro
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Posts: n/a
Default Ripping Vinyl to the computer?

One way to speed up the process is with CD Wave Audio Editor. Once you
record the LP to HDD you have two large files (one for each side). CD Wave
allows you to quickly split the files into individual tracks. It is only
$15. If you add the lame encoder, you can convert the tracks to mp3 as you
save them.

http://www.milosoftware.com/

John


"Mike Rivers" > wrote in message
oups.com...
>
> CyberSurfer wrote:
>> I've got a bunch of old LP's that I want to rip into either MP3, or WAV
>> format on my computer. I'm using XP pro, and an onboard sound card. No
>> sound
>> editing software other than MS sound recorder, which sucks...
>> What software would be good for doing what I want to do?

>
> Well, first of all, the term "rip" suggests file transfer, and there
> are no files to transfer on an LP. You have to play the record and
> record it in real time. To answer your actual question, I'd recommend
> Audacity. It's free for the downloading and it works well. Let your
> fingers do the walking.
>
> Now, you need a way to play the records, and you need a way to get a
> line level signal into your sound card. This requires a turntable and
> some sort of amplifier with RIAA equalization. The cheap solution, if
> you don't have any of that, is to buy a turntable and a receiver cheap
> at a thrift shop or yard sale. A better solution is to get a high
> quality turntable and RIAA preamplifer. The quality of your vinyl
> playback will be the most significant link in the chain. Unless you're
> willing to spend several hundred dollars it won't be better than
> whatever sound card you have so you don't have to worry about replacing
> your computer's audio hardware yet.
>
> I will warn you, though, that it's a very time consuming process.
> Figure on at least two hours per disk unless you want to do a real
> slapdash job. Will you live long eough to transfer your collection? Is
> it really worth the time? Or are you just looking at picking out a few
> favorite albums?
>



  #5  
Old November 28th 05, 01:35 AM posted to rec.audio.pro
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Posts: n/a
Default Ripping Vinyl to the computer?

In article .com>,
Mike Rivers > wrote:
>
>CyberSurfer wrote:
>> I've got a bunch of old LP's that I want to rip into either MP3, or WAV
>> format on my computer. I'm using XP pro, and an onboard sound card. No sound
>> editing software other than MS sound recorder, which sucks...
>> What software would be good for doing what I want to do?

>
>Well, first of all, the term "rip" suggests file transfer, and there
>are no files to transfer on an LP. You have to play the record and
>record it in real time. To answer your actual question, I'd recommend
>Audacity. It's free for the downloading and it works well. Let your
>fingers do the walking.


>Now, you need a way to play the records, and you need a way to get a
>line level signal into your sound card. This requires a turntable and
>some sort of amplifier with RIAA equalization. The cheap solution, if
>you don't have any of that, is to buy a turntable and a receiver cheap
>at a thrift shop or yard sale. A better solution is to get a high
>quality turntable and RIAA preamplifer. The quality of your vinyl
>playback will be the most significant link in the chain. Unless you're
>willing to spend several hundred dollars it won't be better than
>whatever sound card you have so you don't have to worry about replacing
>your computer's audio hardware yet.


And depending on what you are transfering - eg really high quality
LP, or regular LPs [eg no direct disk, etc] I've been using
a turntable that is targeted to DJ's - and it has 78RPM speed - and
I have a lot of those too.

It's a Stanton ST-150 - that cost me $419 with shipping with
cartridge and with a built-in preamp that also has an SPDIF output
that goes directly to my audio card. The really interesting thing
about this TT is that the variable pitch control also has a button
called key-lock - so when you press that you can vary the turntable
speed but the pitch remains the same. I've used it to make
some things that I felt were cut at the wrong tempo sound better.

The Stanton cartridge that comes with it rides high compared to
the high end carts that seem like they want to hug the vinyl.
This makes it easy for wet-playing as the fluids won't wick up.

The best price I got was from djdeals.com - and the price may have
gone up - but you need to email for the current best price.

I only have about 5000 more 45s to go before I start pawing through
the 78s - most of which were never important enough to transfer
to the early LP days let alone anything newer.

Bill

Bill
>
>I will warn you, though, that it's a very time consuming process.
>Figure on at least two hours per disk unless you want to do a real
>slapdash job. Will you live long eough to transfer your collection? Is
>it really worth the time? Or are you just looking at picking out a few
>favorite albums?
>



--
Bill Vermillion - bv @ wjv . com
  #6  
Old November 28th 05, 03:14 AM posted to rec.audio.pro
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Posts: n/a
Default Ripping Vinyl to the computer?

I've done quite a bit of this on my personal lp collection and have had
great results with "Wave Corrector". It breaks up the long wave files
from each lp side into the individual tracks and also does de-clicking
and de-popping pretty well.
This is the only software I've ever used for doing this, and it may or
may not be the best out there for the task, but I'm happy with it.
It's available at:
www.wavecor.co.uk
Guy

 




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