A Audio and hi-fi forum. AudioBanter

Go Back   Home » AudioBanter forum » rec.audio » Tech
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Problem: Sansui 9090 Protector Light Flashing Red



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old July 31st 03, 03:16 AM
Mark D. Zacharias
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Problem: Sansui 9090 Protector Light Flashing Red

OK, I've been waiting to post this. Here it goes:

First, learn some electronic theory and fundamentals, so that you will not
injure or kill yourself, and so you will know a bad part when you find one.
It is critically important to understand theory of operation and signal-flow
if you are to have any hope of repairing most equipment.
Buy a relatively inexpensive digital multimeter, probably at Radio Shack.
An oscilloscope would also be most useful; a decent used one can usually be
found for 100.00 or less.
Learn the appropriate safety considerations for using the tester and 'scope.
There are special considerations for working on most televisions and other
equipment not using a built-in isolation transformer. Most servicers use an
isolation transformer for any AC-powered unit under test.
Learn how to use the multimeter to measure resistance, voltage, and current.
Learn how to use the oscilloscope to observe and analyze waveforms.
Buy a soldering iron, solder, and desoldering equipment.
Learn how to solder and unsolder without damaging the circuit board.
Find a source for replacement parts. Most suppliers have about a 15.00
minimum order.
Order the replacement parts and install them.
Clean the circuit board where you were soldering. Treat the job as if it
were going to be inspected afterwards and graded for neatness.
Visually inspect the piece for any other problems or safety issues.

NOTE:
You are personally responsible for any safety problems you cause, or those
which you
SHOULD have noticed and failed to correct. So if you work on a TV and it
burns down your friend's house in the middle of the night because
of something you missed or that you caused, they can sue you, even years
later.
At this point you can just replace a blown fuse, if any, plug the unit in,
and hope your new parts don't just fail again because you missed something
or installed a part incorrectly. (Or you could use an AC variac to bring up
the line voltage slowly while measuring voltages etc. MCM sells one for
90.00)

Check for normal operation. Watch for any signs of overheating, hum, smoke,
etc and be prepared to shut down quickly.
Test for longer-term operational stability, check for neatness of lead
dress, re-assemble the rest of the way, making sure not to pinch any wires
etc. Make up your mind to re-assemble the piece exactly as it was. If there'
s screws left over, you did a sloppy job.
Final test the piece, and satisfy yourself that there is no possibility of
leakage current between any exposed metal and the AC line. There are several
ways of doing this. Please refer to the manufacturers' service data or your
textbooks.

Decide how to politely tell friends, family, freeloaders and cheapskates
that you must charge appropriately for your work.

Welcome to the exciting world of electronics repair.

Mark Z.



"Sofie" > wrote in message
...
> George:
> Based on your original posting, a manual and a schematic are NOT going to

be
> much help to you...... it will only be of most use to an experienced and
> knowledgeable tech with the proper test equipment, tools, replacement

parts,
> etc. In fact, most techs will repair this kind of problem without the
> manual and schematic.
> The Sansui 9090 is a very nice old and powerful receiver and is worth
> repairing. Take it to a repair shop BEFORE any failed, botched or

aborted
> home repair attempts and at the very least get a repair cost estimate so

you
> can make an INTELLIGENT repair decision with facts instead of internet
> guesses.
> --
> Best Regards,
> Daniel Sofie
> Electronics Supply & Repair
> -----------------------------------
>
>
> > > Today I turned on the Sansui 9090 and the flashing red protector

light
> next to
> > > the power button continuously flashed and the stereo never did go on.

> The tuner
> > > seemed to be picking up signals, as evidenced by the signal meter,

but
> the
> > > sound output meters registered zero and no sound came from the

speakers.
> Usually
> > > the light flashes red for a few seconds, turns green and then the

tuner
> and
> > > stereo activates. Can someone tell me what the cause might be and if

> there is a
> > > simple fix> > I don't have a manual for the unit, and have no idea

what
> the protector light is
> > > for. Can someone tell me where to obtain a manual?
> > > Thanks.
> > > George

>
>
>



Ads
  #2  
Old July 31st 03, 10:48 PM
Rep
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Problem: Sansui 9090 Protector Light Flashing Red

Message like the one you have below implies that you have way too much
lead in your system! You forgot to include wear a mask, do your
soldering on a ventilated system and wash your hands after.

"Mark D. Zacharias" > wrote in message . earthlink.net>...
> OK, I've been waiting to post this. Here it goes:
>
> First, learn some electronic theory and fundamentals, so that you will not
> injure or kill yourself, and so you will know a bad part when you find one.
> It is critically important to understand theory of operation and signal-flow
> if you are to have any hope of repairing most equipment.
> Buy a relatively inexpensive digital multimeter, probably at Radio Shack.
> An oscilloscope would also be most useful; a decent used one can usually be
> found for 100.00 or less.
> Learn the appropriate safety considerations for using the tester and 'scope.
> There are special considerations for working on most televisions and other
> equipment not using a built-in isolation transformer. Most servicers use an
> isolation transformer for any AC-powered unit under test.
> Learn how to use the multimeter to measure resistance, voltage, and current.
> Learn how to use the oscilloscope to observe and analyze waveforms.
> Buy a soldering iron, solder, and desoldering equipment.
> Learn how to solder and unsolder without damaging the circuit board.
> Find a source for replacement parts. Most suppliers have about a 15.00
> minimum order.
> Order the replacement parts and install them.
> Clean the circuit board where you were soldering. Treat the job as if it
> were going to be inspected afterwards and graded for neatness.
> Visually inspect the piece for any other problems or safety issues.
>
> NOTE:
> You are personally responsible for any safety problems you cause, or those
> which you
> SHOULD have noticed and failed to correct. So if you work on a TV and it
> burns down your friend's house in the middle of the night because
> of something you missed or that you caused, they can sue you, even years
> later.
> At this point you can just replace a blown fuse, if any, plug the unit in,
> and hope your new parts don't just fail again because you missed something
> or installed a part incorrectly. (Or you could use an AC variac to bring up
> the line voltage slowly while measuring voltages etc. MCM sells one for
> 90.00)
>
> Check for normal operation. Watch for any signs of overheating, hum, smoke,
> etc and be prepared to shut down quickly.
> Test for longer-term operational stability, check for neatness of lead
> dress, re-assemble the rest of the way, making sure not to pinch any wires
> etc. Make up your mind to re-assemble the piece exactly as it was. If there'
> s screws left over, you did a sloppy job.
> Final test the piece, and satisfy yourself that there is no possibility of
> leakage current between any exposed metal and the AC line. There are several
> ways of doing this. Please refer to the manufacturers' service data or your
> textbooks.
>
> Decide how to politely tell friends, family, freeloaders and cheapskates
> that you must charge appropriately for your work.
>
> Welcome to the exciting world of electronics repair.
>
> Mark Z.
>
>
>
> "Sofie" > wrote in message
> ...
> > George:
> > Based on your original posting, a manual and a schematic are NOT going to

> be
> > much help to you...... it will only be of most use to an experienced and
> > knowledgeable tech with the proper test equipment, tools, replacement

> parts,
> > etc. In fact, most techs will repair this kind of problem without the
> > manual and schematic.
> > The Sansui 9090 is a very nice old and powerful receiver and is worth
> > repairing. Take it to a repair shop BEFORE any failed, botched or

> aborted
> > home repair attempts and at the very least get a repair cost estimate so

> you
> > can make an INTELLIGENT repair decision with facts instead of internet
> > guesses.
> > --
> > Best Regards,
> > Daniel Sofie
> > Electronics Supply & Repair
> > -----------------------------------
> >
> >
> > > > Today I turned on the Sansui 9090 and the flashing red protector

> light
> next to
> > > > the power button continuously flashed and the stereo never did go on.

> The tuner
> > > > seemed to be picking up signals, as evidenced by the signal meter,

> but
> the
> > > > sound output meters registered zero and no sound came from the

> speakers.
> Usually
> > > > the light flashes red for a few seconds, turns green and then the

> tuner
> and
> > > > stereo activates. Can someone tell me what the cause might be and if

> there is a
> > > > simple fix> > I don't have a manual for the unit, and have no idea

> what
> the protector light is
> > > > for. Can someone tell me where to obtain a manual?
> > > > Thanks.
> > > > George

> >
> >
> >

  #3  
Old August 1st 03, 01:51 AM
Mark D. Zacharias
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Problem: Sansui 9090 Protector Light Flashing Red

Sorry, just get a bit weary of the clueless uninitiated who come onto this
group, wanting to know "what always goes wrong" and too cheap to pay to fix
the stuff. They are much more likely to damage the equipment or create a
safety hazard, though the concept of a "Darwin Award Winning Moment" does
appeal to me as it pertains to these people.

Mark Z.


"Rep" > wrote in message
om...
> Message like the one you have below implies that you have way too much
> lead in your system! You forgot to include wear a mask, do your
> soldering on a ventilated system and wash your hands after.
>
> "Mark D. Zacharias" > wrote in message

. earthlink.net>...
> > OK, I've been waiting to post this. Here it goes:
> >
> > First, learn some electronic theory and fundamentals, so that you will

not
> > injure or kill yourself, and so you will know a bad part when you find

one.
> > It is critically important to understand theory of operation and

signal-flow
> > if you are to have any hope of repairing most equipment.
> > Buy a relatively inexpensive digital multimeter, probably at Radio

Shack.
> > An oscilloscope would also be most useful; a decent used one can usually

be
> > found for 100.00 or less.
> > Learn the appropriate safety considerations for using the tester and

'scope.
> > There are special considerations for working on most televisions and

other
> > equipment not using a built-in isolation transformer. Most servicers use

an
> > isolation transformer for any AC-powered unit under test.
> > Learn how to use the multimeter to measure resistance, voltage, and

current.
> > Learn how to use the oscilloscope to observe and analyze waveforms.
> > Buy a soldering iron, solder, and desoldering equipment.
> > Learn how to solder and unsolder without damaging the circuit board.
> > Find a source for replacement parts. Most suppliers have about a 15.00
> > minimum order.
> > Order the replacement parts and install them.
> > Clean the circuit board where you were soldering. Treat the job as if it
> > were going to be inspected afterwards and graded for neatness.
> > Visually inspect the piece for any other problems or safety issues.
> >
> > NOTE:
> > You are personally responsible for any safety problems you cause, or

those
> > which you
> > SHOULD have noticed and failed to correct. So if you work on a TV and it
> > burns down your friend's house in the middle of the night

because
> > of something you missed or that you caused, they can sue you, even years
> > later.
> > At this point you can just replace a blown fuse, if any, plug the unit

in,
> > and hope your new parts don't just fail again because you missed

something
> > or installed a part incorrectly. (Or you could use an AC variac to bring

up
> > the line voltage slowly while measuring voltages etc. MCM sells one for
> > 90.00)
> >
> > Check for normal operation. Watch for any signs of overheating, hum,

smoke,
> > etc and be prepared to shut down quickly.
> > Test for longer-term operational stability, check for neatness of lead
> > dress, re-assemble the rest of the way, making sure not to pinch any

wires
> > etc. Make up your mind to re-assemble the piece exactly as it was. If

there'
> > s screws left over, you did a sloppy job.
> > Final test the piece, and satisfy yourself that there is no possibility

of
> > leakage current between any exposed metal and the AC line. There are

several
> > ways of doing this. Please refer to the manufacturers' service data or

your
> > textbooks.
> >
> > Decide how to politely tell friends, family, freeloaders and cheapskates
> > that you must charge appropriately for your work.
> >
> > Welcome to the exciting world of electronics repair.
> >
> > Mark Z.
> >
> >
> >
> > "Sofie" > wrote in message
> > ...
> > > George:
> > > Based on your original posting, a manual and a schematic are NOT going

to
> > be
> > > much help to you...... it will only be of most use to an experienced

and
> > > knowledgeable tech with the proper test equipment, tools, replacement

> > parts,
> > > etc. In fact, most techs will repair this kind of problem without

the
> > > manual and schematic.
> > > The Sansui 9090 is a very nice old and powerful receiver and is worth
> > > repairing. Take it to a repair shop BEFORE any failed, botched or

> > aborted
> > > home repair attempts and at the very least get a repair cost estimate

so
> > you
> > > can make an INTELLIGENT repair decision with facts instead of internet
> > > guesses.
> > > --
> > > Best Regards,
> > > Daniel Sofie
> > > Electronics Supply & Repair
> > > -----------------------------------
> > >
> > >
> > > > > Today I turned on the Sansui 9090 and the flashing red protector

> > light
> > next to
> > > > > the power button continuously flashed and the stereo never did go

on.
> > The tuner
> > > > > seemed to be picking up signals, as evidenced by the signal

meter,
> > but
> > the
> > > > > sound output meters registered zero and no sound came from the

> > speakers.
> > Usually
> > > > > the light flashes red for a few seconds, turns green and then the

> > tuner
> > and
> > > > > stereo activates. Can someone tell me what the cause might be and

if
> > there is a
> > > > > simple fix> > I don't have a manual for the unit, and have no idea

> > what
> > the protector light is
> > > > > for. Can someone tell me where to obtain a manual?
> > > > > Thanks.
> > > > > George
> > >
> > >
> > >

>



 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Problem with Kenwood KDC-MP625 shutting off Wildcard Car Audio 9 July 26th 04 11:53 AM
Problem With Alpine Head Unit/Type E Subs (Part 2) Brian Lamendola Car Audio 3 May 25th 04 04:58 AM
Mac problem - flashing question mark? will not boot up WideGlide Pro Audio 27 March 14th 04 04:32 AM
rec.audio.car FAQ (Part 1/5) Ian D. Bjorhovde Car Audio 0 March 6th 04 06:54 AM
Problem: Sansui 9090 Flashing red Protector Light [email protected] Tech 1 July 30th 03 01:52 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 07:14 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2014 AudioBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.