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Convert Cordless Phone to Cordless Headphones



 
 
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  #1  
Old October 13th 03, 10:19 AM
OIE
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Default Convert Cordless Phone to Cordless Headphones

I'm just gonna be honest here, and state that I'm sick and tired of
cordless headphones that barely work across my house. I've tried a
couple, admittedly not the best ($50-$100 cordless headphones) and I
get stupid results. I want to mow the lawn, work in the yard, and run
around the house with cordless headphones that never lose connection,
hence the idea in the subject of this posting. Even my cheap $20
cordless phone can go way down the block and I may hear a little fuzz,
but I'll never lose connection. I'm a newbie to soldering and what
have you, but how feasible is it for me to buy a cheap cordless phone
and convert it to a pair of cordless headphones? I'm thinking I
should find the audio input that goes from the telephone wiring to the
base unit and just paste my audio there (I assume the hardest part),
take the handset apart, glue it to some sturdy headphones, and
redirect its output to the headphones, ignoring the voice speaker
entirely. Anyone see any problems with this idea? Would I have to
amplify it? I don't think I would have to, seeing as my cordless
phone is good and loud on its own. I just don't understand why
cordless headphones on the market don't work with the same reliability
that cordless phones do, even when you spend five times as much.
Should I buy a certain frequency of phone, so as to not interfere with
neighbors' cordless phones? Any other ideas?

Is there anything on the market that uses this idea already? I've
been searching ebay, and if I could find this, I'd buy it instead of
going to the trouble of making one. A problem I could see is cordless
phones use nonstandard batteries, but I'm sure I could hack standard
batteries to it (for longer use than the included battery would
provide).

Thanks for any help you can provide! It's got to be possible. There
is no sense in having to pay hundreds of dollars for decent distance
in portable headphones when my $20 cordless phone can do it. Oh, and
just for the record, I could care less about audio quality and I don't
need stereo; mono is fine. I only listen to talk radio on my cordless
headphones.
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  #2  
Old October 13th 03, 02:06 PM
Jerry G.
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Default Convert Cordless Phone to Cordless Headphones

You not just buy a cheap walkman. Then you can go anywhere! It will also be
of much better quality.

--

Greetings,

Jerry Greenberg GLG Technologies GLG
=========================================
WebPage http://www.zoom-one.com
Electronics http://www.zoom-one.com/electron.htm
=========================================


"OIE" > wrote in message
...
I'm just gonna be honest here, and state that I'm sick and tired of
cordless headphones that barely work across my house. I've tried a
couple, admittedly not the best ($50-$100 cordless headphones) and I
get stupid results. I want to mow the lawn, work in the yard, and run
around the house with cordless headphones that never lose connection,
hence the idea in the subject of this posting. Even my cheap $20
cordless phone can go way down the block and I may hear a little fuzz,
but I'll never lose connection. I'm a newbie to soldering and what
have you, but how feasible is it for me to buy a cheap cordless phone
and convert it to a pair of cordless headphones? I'm thinking I
should find the audio input that goes from the telephone wiring to the
base unit and just paste my audio there (I assume the hardest part),
take the handset apart, glue it to some sturdy headphones, and
redirect its output to the headphones, ignoring the voice speaker
entirely. Anyone see any problems with this idea? Would I have to
amplify it? I don't think I would have to, seeing as my cordless
phone is good and loud on its own. I just don't understand why
cordless headphones on the market don't work with the same reliability
that cordless phones do, even when you spend five times as much.
Should I buy a certain frequency of phone, so as to not interfere with
neighbors' cordless phones? Any other ideas?

Is there anything on the market that uses this idea already? I've
been searching ebay, and if I could find this, I'd buy it instead of
going to the trouble of making one. A problem I could see is cordless
phones use nonstandard batteries, but I'm sure I could hack standard
batteries to it (for longer use than the included battery would
provide).

Thanks for any help you can provide! It's got to be possible. There
is no sense in having to pay hundreds of dollars for decent distance
in portable headphones when my $20 cordless phone can do it. Oh, and
just for the record, I could care less about audio quality and I don't
need stereo; mono is fine. I only listen to talk radio on my cordless
headphones.


  #3  
Old October 13th 03, 06:57 PM
Todd H.
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Posts: n/a
Default Convert Cordless Phone to Cordless Headphones

OIE > writes:

> I'm just gonna be honest here, and state that I'm sick and tired of
> cordless headphones that barely work across my house. I've tried a
> couple, admittedly not the best ($50-$100 cordless headphones) and I
> get stupid results. I want to mow the lawn, work in the yard, and run
> around the house with cordless headphones that never lose connection,
> hence the idea in the subject of this posting. Even my cheap $20
> cordless phone can go way down the block and I may hear a little fuzz,
> but I'll never lose connection. I'm a newbie to soldering and what
> have you, but how feasible is it for me to buy a cheap cordless phone
> and convert it to a pair of cordless headphones? I'm thinking I
> should find the audio input that goes from the telephone wiring to the
> base unit and just paste my audio there (I assume the hardest part),
> take the handset apart, glue it to some sturdy headphones, and
> redirect its output to the headphones, ignoring the voice speaker
> entirely. Anyone see any problems with this idea?


The main one is that telephony frequency ranges are typically 300Hz to
3kHz--a paltry slice of the 20-20kHz that is demanded of audio
applications.

Best Regards,
--
/"\ ASCII Ribbon Campaign | Todd H
\ / | http://www.toddh.net/
X Promoting good netiquette | http://triplethreatband.com/
/ \ http://www.toddh.net/netiquette/ | "4 lines suffice."
  #4  
Old October 14th 03, 05:33 AM
Richard Crowley
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Default Convert Cordless Phone to Cordless Headphones

> OIE writes:
> > entirely. Anyone see any problems with this idea?


"Todd H." wrote ...
> The main one is that telephony frequency ranges are typically 300Hz to
> 3kHz--a paltry slice of the 20-20kHz that is demanded of audio
> applications.


Not to mention that telephones are, by definition, mono.


  #5  
Old October 14th 03, 02:08 PM
TCS
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Posts: n/a
Default Convert Cordless Phone to Cordless Headphones

On Mon, 13 Oct 2003 21:33:30 -0700, Richard Crowley > wrote:
>> OIE writes:
>> > entirely. Anyone see any problems with this idea?


>"Todd H." wrote ...
>> The main one is that telephony frequency ranges are typically 300Hz to
>> 3kHz--a paltry slice of the 20-20kHz that is demanded of audio
>> applications.


>Not to mention that telephones are, by definition, mono.



and only have a 30db dynamic range.

If you think music on hold sounds good, then by all means try it.
  #6  
Old October 15th 03, 03:17 AM
Barry Mann
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Default Convert Cordless Phone to Cordless Headphones

In >, on 10/13/03
at 09:19 AM, OIE > said:


[ ... ]

> I'm a newbie to soldering and what
>have you, but how feasible is it for me to buy a cheap cordless phone
>and convert it to a pair of cordless headphones?


[ ... ]

In theory, wireless telephones could be used for this purpose, but
there will be challenges to overcome. If you are successful, the
quality will not be very good. As another respondent remarked, "If you
think music on hold sounds good, then by all means try it." You'll need
two for stereo.

I've used wireless headphones that will cover a house and a small yard
(50 feet or so). Try placing the base unit as high as possible. There
are also some FM transmitter kits that would be much more appropriate
and easier to adapt for this purpose than phones. (The FM transmitter
could be received by any nearby FM broadcast radio)

If you decide to struggle with the wireless phones, start with a model
that offers an intercom function.

-----------------------------------------------------------
SPAM:
wordgame:123(abc):<14 9 20 5 2 9 18 4 at 22 15 9 3 5 14 5 20 dot 3 15
13> (Barry Mann)
[sorry about the puzzle, SPAMers are ruining my mailbox]
-----------------------------------------------------------

 




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