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How consistent are studio monitors of the same make and model?



 
 
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  #11  
Old July 17th 20, 06:59 PM posted to rec.audio.pro
Adrian Tuddenham[_2_]
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Default How consistent are studio monitors of the same make and model?

geoff > wrote:

> On 16/07/2020 8:53 pm, Don Pearce wrote:
> > On Tue, 14 Jul 2020 21:08:39 -0700 (PDT), James Price
> > > wrote:
> >
> >> How do manufacturers ensure a high degree of sonic consistency (eg.
> >> frequency response, max peak SPL, etc.) between studio monitors of the
> >> same make and model? *Is* there a high degree of sonic consistency
> >> between two seemingly identical studio monitors/playback systems?

> >
> > If you take as an example the LS3/5A BBC monitor speaker, the B110
> > bass drivers were selected to have a resonance frequency within 5Hz
> > for a matched pair. The internal resonance of the cabinet will pull
> > the speakers into line from that tolerance.
> >
> > d
> >

>
> My (self-built, complete with auto-transformer) LS3-5As are lined,
> instead of with bitumous sheet, lead !


I used the B110 and a soft-dome SEAS H881 tweeter with a pair of B139s,
each unit driven by its own amplifier in a closed cabinet design; the
four amplifiers and their power supply are built into the cabinet. The
B110's aren't called on to go down as far as their resonance frequency,
so matching between them isn't quite as critical. They are mounted in
fairly stiff enclosures damped with sandwiches of bitumen and
galavanised steel plates. The enclosures are tapered to reduce the
'organ pipe' effect and they also served as bracing members between the
front and back panels of the outer L.F. cabinets.

The main cabinet is divided into three unequal sections by two
perforated shelves which break up longitudinal air resonances and brace
the side and back panels. The panels are further damped by a sandwich
of galvanised steel plates and roofing felt. Knocking anywhere on them
wth the knuckles produces a dead 'thunk' (followed by "ouch!"). They
weigh 1 cwt (50kg) each.

The crossover is an 'active' design with cascaded state-variable
filters. It is interesting to note that the LS3/5a used twin amplifiers
and an active crossover during the design phase and was only fitted with
a passive crossover when it went into production (the BBC had to farm
out the design of that because it was so complex).


--
~ Adrian Tuddenham ~
(Remove the ".invalid"s and add ".co.uk" to reply)
www.poppyrecords.co.uk
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  #13  
Old July 18th 20, 01:36 AM posted to rec.audio.pro
[email protected]
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Default How consistent are studio monitors of the same make and model?

geoff:

It was my first foray with passive reference monitors,
**** on it like you do most of what I contribute here,
it's all good.

Just the NS-10s with original grills on top of their OEM stands
hooked up to a receiver and CD player.
  #14  
Old July 18th 20, 01:44 AM posted to rec.audio.pro
Scott Dorsey
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Default How consistent are studio monitors of the same make and model?

> wrote:
>Semi-related: I recently auditioned a used pair of
>NS-10Ms, and when they said FLAT they meant it.
>I mean NO coloration that I detected. Of course they
>sounded bass-shy, but that has more to do with how we
>hear than to do with those Yamahas.


Just think how great Auratones must be then!
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
  #16  
Old July 18th 20, 04:25 PM posted to rec.audio.pro
John Williamson
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Default How consistent are studio monitors of the same make and model?

On 18/07/2020 12:48, geoff wrote:

> I don't actually have any NS10s, but I do have a pair of NS20s. But they
> are not remotely the same thing.
>

The reason I used to hear for having a pair of NS-10s to hand was that
you make the best mix you can on your normal full range monitors, check
it on cheap headphones and a car system, and then listen on the NS-10s
while looking at it and watching how the cone distorts physically on the
bass notes.

If it still sounds good and the bass driver cone doesn't distort too
badly on the NS-10, then the mix is okay for any sensible listening system.

They were the archetypal cheap and nasty speaker.

--
Tciao for Now!

John.
  #17  
Old July 18th 20, 04:35 PM posted to rec.audio.pro
Scott Dorsey
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Default How consistent are studio monitors of the same make and model?

John Williamson > wrote:
>If it still sounds good and the bass driver cone doesn't distort too
>badly on the NS-10, then the mix is okay for any sensible listening system.
>
>They were the archetypal cheap and nasty speaker.


But they were (and still are) a consistent and reliable cheap and nasty
speaker. They are the same in every studio. That was a big deal back in
the days of big soffit-mounted systems that sounded different in every
control room, and even though it's not as big a deal today it's still a
thing people like.

I'm not sure it's as good a mix check as it used to be... people are more
often listening on desktop 2.1 systems that are awful in different ways
than the NS-10 is awful.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
  #18  
Old July 18th 20, 04:55 PM posted to rec.audio.pro
John Williamson
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Default How consistent are studio monitors of the same make and model?

On 18/07/2020 16:35, Scott Dorsey wrote:
> John Williamson > wrote:
>> If it still sounds good and the bass driver cone doesn't distort too
>> badly on the NS-10, then the mix is okay for any sensible listening system.
>>
>> They were the archetypal cheap and nasty speaker.

>
> But they were (and still are) a consistent and reliable cheap and nasty
> speaker. They are the same in every studio. That was a big deal back in
> the days of big soffit-mounted systems that sounded different in every
> control room, and even though it's not as big a deal today it's still a
> thing people like.
>
> I'm not sure it's as good a mix check as it used to be... people are more
> often listening on desktop 2.1 systems that are awful in different ways
> than the NS-10 is awful.
>

Agreed.

I have one such nearby....

--
Tciao for Now!

John.
  #19  
Old July 18th 20, 06:45 PM posted to rec.audio.pro
[email protected]
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Posts: 1,742
Default How consistent are studio monitors of the same make and model?

Scott, geoff:

'Flat'(speakers, headphones, etc.) is not going to sound
good, simply because our hearing is anything but!

Why do you always find smiley EQ settings or the Bass
and Treble fully clockwise on consumer rigs? Because
those are the regions where most people's hearing is least
sensitive.
 




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