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Restoring a Sherwood S-5000



 
 
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  #1  
Old January 12th 14, 07:52 PM posted to rec.audio.tubes
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Default Restoring a Sherwood S-5000

Hello all,

One of my favorite tube amps has to be the Sherwood S-5000. It's a little gem of an integrated amp that is quite easily underestimated. Most people would put it in the same class as a Scott 299, also a 6BQ5 amp, although the Sherwood is really a 7189 amp, and actually uses the higher plate voltage possible with the 7189. It also has larger output transformers, and manages to put out 24w RMS per channel.

The pre-amp section, despite having dated ideas about tone control and Fletcher-Munson curves (thankfully switchable) maintains a very neutral and open sound. The bass and treble knobs are actually usable and helpful at times, and don't have some insane Q that belies their center frequency. The phono section is startlingly good so long as the original Telefunken 12AX7s are occupying the two sockets in the phono section. There are a handful of other tubes that can work there as well, but filament hum and microphonics plague any U.S. made 12AX7 or 7025 I have ever tried in this amp, shield or no.

The use of 7199 tubes as the phase splitter/driver tubes is somewhat unfortunate since they are hard to obtain these days. The upshot is that they seem to last a very long time in this circuit, and they sound quite good. Some have attempted to use 6GH8A in this position, or modern Russian 7199 that are actually re-pinned 6GH8A, and I would strongly discourage that. They don't sound right at all. Just ask the ST-70 crowd. You'd have to modify the circuit, and I think that in this case, that's just daft. The 7199 last too long and sound too good to make that a useful mod, IMHO.

In this thread, I will be going over the basic steps of reviving a Sherwood S-5000 as I rebuild yet another one of these beauties. This is more or less your standard re-cap job, plus replacing the selenium rectifier in the bias supply. There are however some things that are specific to this amp, little tricks for dealing with the tight chassis space, and other stuff too. The way capacitors are mounted in this amp is a real pain. It uses twist-lock can caps, one of which is mounted at a 35 degree angle.

If -YOU- have an S-5000 or S-4400 and you have any questions about it, please feel free to ask away and I will cover the topic in this thread. I've dealt with just about everything there is do deal with on these amps, as this will be the 6th one I've restored. The S-5000II is a totally different beast using 7591s, and I will not be covering that amp here.

Still trying to figure out where I will post pics and schematics so I can post links here, so give me a little while on that.

For those of you exclusively into DIY, the S-5000 circuit is a very cool and sweet sounding 7189 amp. It's the only amp I've seen that gets 24 watts out of a pair of 7189s. I've made one using the Triode Electronics ST-70 board as a front-end and the result was so good that it sold for $1000 despite being a prototype and not terribly well built. It was in a Hammond box as I recall, but I did engine turn the top at least. So we can also discuss DIY around this circuit in this thread if anyone wants.

This is my favorite vintage amp of all time, so I can talk about it endlessly without getting bored.

Feel free to ask away as I prepare some pics and schematics to get this started.


-forkinthesocket

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  #2  
Old January 12th 14, 10:11 PM posted to rec.audio.tubes
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Posts: 18
Default Restoring a Sherwood S-5000


Ok, pics coming soon...

First step was to take voltage measurements off the bias and HV+ rails. Here's what I got on my S-5000. By the way, there are two variants of the S-5000 that I will discuss later, basically the older, longer version and the newer, shorter version. The one I am working on here is one of the shorter types.

After the 20uf cap coming off the rectifier, there is a 33 ohm 7w resistor connecting to the next cap section, [email protected] According to documentation, this point should measure 415v (plate) but I often find that it reads higher. This particular amp is currently measuring 438v on the plates! This is why you really have to have a 7189 here, or at least a beefy 6BQ5 that is known to handle high plate voltages. I've seen lesser Sovteks arc over in these amps before.

So, according to my Sams photofact, the correct voltages going down the HV+ rail are as follows on the left, and this amp is as follows on the right:

Photofact This S-5000

C1/A - 420v 442v
C1/B - 415v 438v
C1/C - 350v 365v
C2/A - 275v 285v
C2/B - 225v 204v

So right off the bat something looks amiss - All these voltages are a bit higher than listed, but that is ok. What is odd is that they're all higher except for one, which is quite a bit lower. That second section of C2 should be higher than 225v, since everything else is higher than listed. Instead, it's 21 volts lower than listed. I suspect this points to either that dropping resistor or that cap section being leaky. Either that, or current draw after that dropping resistor is higher than it's supposed to be for some reason. We'll have to get to the bottom of that.

Now on to the bias supply. It's interesting to note that the bias supply also supplies DC filament current to the two phono preamp tubes, which makes it even more interesting that I've never gotten a US made 12AX7 to sound good in those positions, getting hum regardless. I suppose it means that it was more induced hum from the surroundings than from the filaments as I had stated earlier, or perhaps there was something amiss in the amp in which I tried it. I will have to re-visit that whole thing once this is finished..

There are no real test points listed in the bias supply other than the final ouptut voltage, which is supposed to be -20v. This amp is currently putting out -21.8, which is probably right on target considering the plate voltage is running a tad high - the extra bias voltage is welcome. In fact, I'd like to see it a little higher, and once the selenium rectifier is swapped out for silicon diodes, I'll expect to see closer to -23v. A real indication of the health of this circuit will be the DC voltages at the phono tubes, since these actually have some current draw to them

Sam's Photofact This S-5000

C3/A - Unlisted -29.3v
C3/B - 24v 22.74v
C3/C - -20v -21.8v
V1 Fil - 24v 22.74
V2 Fil - 12v 11.06


So the bias supply looks good, but the DC voltages to the phono preamp section looks a tad soft. Who knows, filament starving can have nice effects, but It'll be interesting to see what happens when the selenium rectifier and those electrolytics are replaced. I always see the bias voltage increase, so the filament should as well. This SAM's photofact has the polarity of the bias cap backwards, FYI. I will post it all soon when I figure out where to put all the uploads for this project.


It should be noted that this amp currently works and sounds fantastic. No signs of hum, very clean sound, no issues at all except the power transformer gets a little bit hotter than I think it should be. Thermal gun measurements have gotten close to 136F. My experience tells me that the second rev. of the S-5000, which this one is, tend to run a little hotter due to smaller iron. However, I still feel this one is a bit hotter than it should be after two hours of running and I think a power supply rebuild might lower that figure by 10 degrees. Still, for a bone-stock amp built in 1959, this thing is nothing short of amazing.

More to come soon!


-forkinthesocket
  #3  
Old January 12th 14, 11:32 PM posted to rec.audio.tubes
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Posts: 18
Default Restoring a Sherwood S-5000

Ok, so I guess I can just share the photos and schamtics via dropbox.

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/y4j5cv5ro8o5yja/cvW9ncqTtV#/

Here's what's in there so far:

Pictures of the various twistlock can caps that are there
A picture of the underbelly of the amp
A picture of the unbelievably wrong Sam's photofact of the bias supply
A picture of the -Actual- Sherwood schematic right from a manual, applying to this second rev of Sherwood S-5000
A picture of the selenium rectifier which will be replaced


Regarding the voltages I measured in my last post, it is good to note that Sherwood has different voltages listed in their schematic. However, the Sams schematic is referring to the first rev. of the S-5000, the 'longer chassis' model. These two models can easily be distinguished visually, by the way. The newer one has all the 12AX7s up front mounted flat and underneath a square tube cage with slotted vents and a tube placement sticker. The old version has the preamp tubes at a 45 degree angle, with individual tube shields.

So, let's re-do that chart against the Sherwood schematic since I think that will be more in line with reality in this particular amp. FYI, the Sams schematic has some SERIOUS errors in the bias section, mainly that the capacitors and diodes are in there backwards. Their version magically produces negative volts from positive diodes and caps. Sheesh. So that should never be used for anything.

Sherwood Schematic This S-5000

C53/A - unlisted 442v
C53/B - 425v 438v
C53/C - 350v 365v
C24/A - 270v 285v
C24/B - 250v 204v


That is very telling. We see that the plate voltage is much closer to being 'in-spec' than before, though it is still a tad high, I recall that always being the case in these amps. Nevertheless, we have even more of a problem now in the second section of C24, as we are now 46v shy of the listed value. This is looking even more like a real problem than it did before. Also note that Sherwood calls these two caps C53 and C24, where Sams calls them C1 & C2, which is probably a more logical choice. Nevertheless, from here on out I will refer to the Sherwood schematic. If somebody wants to discuss an older chassis, we can do that too...

I think that's all for today, though I might get around to replacing the selenium rectifier.


-forkinthesocket
  #4  
Old January 13th 14, 11:29 PM posted to rec.audio.tubes
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Posts: 18
Default Restoring a Sherwood S-5000

Hello all,

Made some progress on the bias supply yesterday, but didn't get around to posting it. First, the selenium rectifier he
https://www.dropbox.com/s/27opjx5auy..._Rectifier.jpg

has been replaced with a pair diodes and a pair of caps mounted to a terminal strip as seen he
https://www.dropbox.com/s/bfynay796k...eplacement.jpg

There is nothing special about these diodes, they are rated for 1000v (total overkill) and 1.5 amps. Since silicone diodes tend to generate a bit of switching noise, two [email protected] mica caps have been added to shunt that noise to ground. While the center post of this terminal strip is mounted to the chassis, I find that using that mechanical connection as a ground can be hit and miss, so instead, I run a ground wire inside the chassis and solder it to the bottom of a cap can. Here is the diode bridge installed in the amp where the selenium rectifier once was:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/nzy9mw08cq..._installed.jpg

"But wait!", you say "Aren't you going to replace the capacitor cans?" Well, yes we are. But we are only going to replace the two HV+ capacitors, and while we will also replace the caps in the bias supply, we will not remove the old capacitor can. Why? Because it is a very rare capacitor can with COMMON POSITIVE. All other can caps are common negative, and you simply will not find a replacement for this bias supply can. So, we will have to rebuild the bias supply using axial and/or radial caps stuffed underneath the amp. Don't worry, there's room as we'll see later. For now solder the ground to an unused common terminal on the bias cap can as I did with the green wire he

https://www.dropbox.com/s/1knvs3qlc6...for_diodes.jpg

In order to mount the new diode bridge, I first had to cut 7/8" off the old mounting bolt for the selenium rectifier in order to use it. I just used the bolt cutter on my strippers. Check it out:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/eqwe6e7vgf..._off_screw.jpg

Ok, so I got all that done, now it's time to fire up the amp and take measurements. Oh crap! One of the output tubes is arcing over now! Better get the tester out!

After testing my output tubes, it turns out that it was a complete coincidence. One of the tubes had already had a part come loose inside, and all I had to do was operate the amp upside down to make the short happen. After testing, 3 tubes flunked the test. One arcs over, the other tests with shorts, and the last one is weak. Dang, and they're all Amperex Bugle Boys..... Anyway, after digging through my stash, I found a replacement for these three guys he

https://www.dropbox.com/s/y1suozb1di..._bad_tubes.jpg

Ok, now the amp fires up without any drama. As I expected before, my bias voltage has now risen up and is now -24.85v, about where I expect it to be with silicon diodes and no dropping resistor. Yes, you can get a couple more watts out of this thing with a lower bias, but the wear and tear on the output tubes and the heat generated makes it scarcely worth it, IMHO.

The DC filament voltages are now 26.1 and 12.7 volts at V2 and V1 respectively, up from 11.06 and 22.74. These might be just a touch high, but they're within the realm of sane. I may in fact try to put a slightly higher value dropping resistor in front of these.

I have also made some interesting observations regarding the voltages listed on the schematics, versus real life and I will get to that in my next post.
  #5  
Old January 14th 14, 04:35 AM posted to rec.audio.tubes
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Posts: 5
Default Restoring a Sherwood S-5000

On Sunday, January 12, 2014 2:52:54 PM UTC-5, wrote:
> Hello all, One of my favorite tube amps has to be the Sherwood S-5000. ....

-forkinthesocket

Thank you for the weath of info! I happen to have an S-5000 that I love. It has a hum in the phono preamp though.. something I would like to get rid of. I really like how you can vary the loudness curve by adjusting the preamp volume along with the master volume, that plus the tone controls gives me plenty of ability to get the sound I want at any level. A very well thought out amp. The selector switch allows stereo, reverse stereo, mono channel A, mono B, & mono A+B plus, pulling out the balance knob changes the phase on one channel. Very flexible!
Here is a video of me testing it out when I first got it:
http://youtu.be/pRzVHkyYUso
It is now in my listening room connected to a set of vintage Warfedale speakers..

--JRC
  #6  
Old January 14th 14, 05:28 AM posted to rec.audio.tubes
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Posts: 18
Default Restoring a Sherwood S-5000

Hi there!

Cool to see you here! I remember that video on YouTube! Man, what a fantastic rig you have behind it.

Looks like you have a later version of the S-5000 that I refer to as the short chassis, which is also the one I am working on here. From the video it looks like some work has been done on it already, notably the bias supply rectifier looks to have been replaced. We should also check the date codes on the capacitors to see what has and has not yet been done.

So far in this thread, I have measured the HV+ rail, and the bias+phono filament supply. Then, I replaced the selenium rectifier with an odd little arrangement of diodes and caps that I will explain later... Usually folks use one cap to hush the diode noise, I now use three; two at the diodes from their inputs to ground, and one on the bias voltage wire at the junction with the first electrolytic filter cap. That last one hasn't been added in my amp yet since that junction is going to be done along with the filter caps.

So, when you have a chance, check out those voltages (be careful, these are HIGH voltages) and post your results. Also, I am curious to see what make of tubes you have in your phono section, or for that matter the whole amp. From the top front of the amp, these will be the first two tubes, from left to right. They're directly behind the selector and balance knobs. If you're not sure what make they are, snap pictures of them. I am interested to see if they are Telefunken or not.

Good luck and let me know if you have any questions or issues. Oh, and welcome to RAT, by the way.

-forkinthesocket
  #7  
Old January 16th 14, 12:55 AM posted to rec.audio.tubes
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Default Restoring a Sherwood S-5000

While we wait to hear from JRC, let's go over the parts list for the rebuild.

First, let's talk about the large twistlock cap right behind the output tube section. This is the main filter capacitor for the HV+ supply, and it takes the brunt of the wear in the power supply. The reason for this is mainly because the capacitor is located in a spot which positively guarantees that it will get baked by the output tubes. Here is a picture of it:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/2lq2ltcke4gt11w/S-5000_C1.jpg

It's also peculiar in that it is mounted at an angle, just as the power tubes are, which is what gives this amplifier such a low height. There are a few schools of thought on twistlocks like these. Some people prefer to cut them open from the bottom, gut them, and stuff them with new radial or axial caps. The other notion is to simply put those same caps underneath the amp and re-wire everything to accommodate that. Some feel replacing the whole can is best when there are replacements available. Lastly, some people feel that they can magically 'reform' capacitors by doing some sort of rain dance with a variac. As you may have guessed, I do not fall into that last group of people.

While there probably are certain capacitors in certain amps that may respond to such a thing, this particular cap in this spot sees too much voltage and too much heat not to be somewhat degraded by now. Some of these S-5000s were never ran with the cover, since the cover was an additional cost; not included with the amplifier purchase. Lots of these were placed into consoles and the like and so did not build up all that much heat. These ones can often sound OK with the original cap. The S-5000 running inside its cover, especially a leatherette covered one will just cook away in there. These almost always have noticeable hum when played.

If we look underneath the cap he

https://www.dropbox.com/s/pefyhgh7l6...onnections.jpg

We see that there isn't a whole lot of room for adding caps underneath, without resorting to putting them in odd places, and adding new wires and terminal strips. So really, our best options are to either replace the can or stuff it with new caps. Since there are very good replacements available from CE, I suggest the extra money spend on this:

http://www.tubesandmore.com/products/C-EC4020X2-525

Is well worth it, especially considering the effort in re-stuffing a capacitor. Note that this capacitor is a 40/40/20/20 sectioned cap at 525v. The original Sherwood design called for a 20/40/40/5 sectioned cap at 500v for the first three sections, and 350 volts for the 5uf section. This CE cap is physically the same dimensions as the Sherwood cap, offers 25 more working volts, and gives us an extra 15uf on one section. As long as we are careful to wire the 20uf section to the 5AR4 rectifier, this cap is an ideal replacement.

Speaking of the 5AR4 and 20uf, there is a reason you must not increase the value of this particular cap. Tube rectifiers have a maximum capacitance that can be directly connected to the output. Those values are usually listed in tube manuals. If you add more here, the rectifier will likely arc over due to the current draw. After the first dropping resistor, you can literally add as much capacitance as you want, as the current rush will now be limited by that resistor. It is possible, however, to introduce a resonance by altering the R-C time constant by doing this. I have seen one S-5000 that wound up with a very low frequency power supply oscillation as a result of an odd re-cap, it showed up as very pronounced woofer excursion at around .5hz, which one might think would be beyond the capability of the output transformers, but obviously not.

So, in this case, everything will retain its original values except for the last section which will increase to 20uf from 5. I personally feel that 40uf is just adequate for the first section off the dropping resistor. Depending on how the terminals of this cap are laid out, I may decide to use the additional 20uf section to increase the first 40uf section to 60uf, and simply add a 10 or 20uf cap underneath for that last section. Since I have not used this particular cap before, I will have to wait until I have it on hand to see if the terminals and distances underneath will allow this. In the past, I have used Aero-M capacitors for this part, and was able to add capacitance easily.

For the second twistlock capacitor, I'm going to try this:

http://www.tubesandmore.com/products/C-EC20-20-450

Here's the original in the amp:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/kvxfs3grlzzpqfw/S-5000_C2.jpg

This is interesting - last time I did one of these S-5000s, there were no fresh stock 1" twistlocks available. Here we have a 20/20 @450v that is the same dimensions as the stock capacitor! The stock cap is a 20/30 @ 400, so we get a higher voltage rating with this cap, but come up 10uf short. However, there is plenty of room underneath next to this cap to add another 10uf or more. So, I'm going to order one of these to find out if they're suitable.

Lastly, we have the oddball bias supply capacitor. It has a common positive can, something that I rarely see anywhere else but on Sherwood amps. Anyone else know of amps that use these? I'm curious! As a side note, if you are ever working on a Sherwood and you see a twistlock capacitor can that is covered in cardboard, that can has high voltage on it and that cardboard is there as an insulator. Be careful with those!! Luckily, they don't exist on the s-5000 but you see them a lot in later Sherwood amps.

Anyway, the bias cap... It's a 250/150/50 @ 50v cap, and the best bet is to just leave it in place, and use axials or radials underneath to replace it. We don't need to go crazy here with capacitance, maybe a -little- more on the bias supply to lower ripple, but the vaules here seem pretty acceptable in practice.

So that's the update for now... I'm going to order the parts tomorrow and we'll see next week how they work out.


-forkinthesocket





  #8  
Old January 16th 14, 09:13 AM posted to rec.audio.tubes
Andre Jute[_2_]
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Posts: 631
Default Restoring a Sherwood S-5000

Yo, Dorkinthesocket, if you're such a newbie that you don't even have a junk box with a couple of IN4xxx in it, like a proper experimenter, as we see in your other self-important post, you really want to start in electronics with something less dangerous than tube voltages. -- Andre Jute

On Thursday, January 16, 2014 12:55:25 AM UTC, wrote:
> While we wait to hear from JRC, let's go over the parts list for the rebuild.
>
>
>
> First, let's talk about the large twistlock cap right behind the output tube section. This is the main filter capacitor for the HV+ supply, and it takes the brunt of the wear in the power supply. The reason for this is mainly because the capacitor is located in a spot which positively guarantees that it will get baked by the output tubes. Here is a picture of it:
>
>
>
> https://www.dropbox.com/s/2lq2ltcke4gt11w/S-5000_C1.jpg
>
>
>
> It's also peculiar in that it is mounted at an angle, just as the power tubes are, which is what gives this amplifier such a low height. There are a few schools of thought on twistlocks like these. Some people prefer to cut them open from the bottom, gut them, and stuff them with new radial or axial caps. The other notion is to simply put those same caps underneath the amp and re-wire everything to accommodate that. Some feel replacing the whole can is best when there are replacements available. Lastly, some people feel that they can magically 'reform' capacitors by doing some sort of rain dance with a variac. As you may have guessed, I do not fall into that last group of people.
>
>
>
> While there probably are certain capacitors in certain amps that may respond to such a thing, this particular cap in this spot sees too much voltage and too much heat not to be somewhat degraded by now. Some of these S-5000s were never ran with the cover, since the cover was an additional cost; not included with the amplifier purchase. Lots of these were placed into consoles and the like and so did not build up all that much heat. These ones can often sound OK with the original cap. The S-5000 running inside its cover, especially a leatherette covered one will just cook away in there. These almost always have noticeable hum when played.
>
>
>
> If we look underneath the cap he
>
>
>
> https://www.dropbox.com/s/pefyhgh7l6...onnections.jpg
>
>
>
> We see that there isn't a whole lot of room for adding caps underneath, without resorting to putting them in odd places, and adding new wires and terminal strips. So really, our best options are to either replace the can or stuff it with new caps. Since there are very good replacements available from CE, I suggest the extra money spend on this:
>
>
>
> http://www.tubesandmore.com/products/C-EC4020X2-525
>
>
>
> Is well worth it, especially considering the effort in re-stuffing a capacitor. Note that this capacitor is a 40/40/20/20 sectioned cap at 525v. The original Sherwood design called for a 20/40/40/5 sectioned cap at 500v for the first three sections, and 350 volts for the 5uf section. This CE cap is physically the same dimensions as the Sherwood cap, offers 25 more working volts, and gives us an extra 15uf on one section. As long as we are careful to wire the 20uf section to the 5AR4 rectifier, this cap is an ideal replacement.
>
>
>
> Speaking of the 5AR4 and 20uf, there is a reason you must not increase the value of this particular cap. Tube rectifiers have a maximum capacitance that can be directly connected to the output. Those values are usually listed in tube manuals. If you add more here, the rectifier will likely arc over due to the current draw. After the first dropping resistor, you can literally add as much capacitance as you want, as the current rush will now be limited by that resistor. It is possible, however, to introduce a resonance by altering the R-C time constant by doing this. I have seen one S-5000 that wound up with a very low frequency power supply oscillation as a result of an odd re-cap, it showed up as very pronounced woofer excursion at around .5hz, which one might think would be beyond the capability of the output transformers, but obviously not.
>
>
>
> So, in this case, everything will retain its original values except for the last section which will increase to 20uf from 5. I personally feel that 40uf is just adequate for the first section off the dropping resistor. Depending on how the terminals of this cap are laid out, I may decide to use the additional 20uf section to increase the first 40uf section to 60uf, and simply add a 10 or 20uf cap underneath for that last section. Since I have not used this particular cap before, I will have to wait until I have it on hand to see if the terminals and distances underneath will allow this. In the past, I have used Aero-M capacitors for this part, and was able to add capacitance easily.
>
>
>
> For the second twistlock capacitor, I'm going to try this:
>
>
>
> http://www.tubesandmore.com/products/C-EC20-20-450
>
>
>
> Here's the original in the amp:
>
>
>
> https://www.dropbox.com/s/kvxfs3grlzzpqfw/S-5000_C2.jpg
>
>
>
> This is interesting - last time I did one of these S-5000s, there were no fresh stock 1" twistlocks available. Here we have a 20/20 @450v that is the same dimensions as the stock capacitor! The stock cap is a 20/30 @ 400, so we get a higher voltage rating with this cap, but come up 10uf short. However, there is plenty of room underneath next to this cap to add another 10uf or more. So, I'm going to order one of these to find out if they're suitable.
>
>
>
> Lastly, we have the oddball bias supply capacitor. It has a common positive can, something that I rarely see anywhere else but on Sherwood amps. Anyone else know of amps that use these? I'm curious! As a side note, if you are ever working on a Sherwood and you see a twistlock capacitor can that is covered in cardboard, that can has high voltage on it and that cardboard is there as an insulator. Be careful with those!! Luckily, they don't exist on the s-5000 but you see them a lot in later Sherwood amps.
>
>
>
> Anyway, the bias cap... It's a 250/150/50 @ 50v cap, and the best bet is to just leave it in place, and use axials or radials underneath to replace it. We don't need to go crazy here with capacitance, maybe a -little- more on the bias supply to lower ripple, but the vaules here seem pretty acceptable in practice.
>
>
>
> So that's the update for now... I'm going to order the parts tomorrow and we'll see next week how they work out.
>
>
>
>
>
> -forkinthesocket

  #9  
Old January 19th 14, 01:25 AM posted to rec.audio.tubes
[email protected]
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Posts: 5
Default Restoring a Sherwood S-5000

ha.. wow.
Hey forkinthesocket..
I finally got my Sherwood, multimeter and a glass of SOCO in the same room... and my wife and kid in another room! Gonna be taking those measurements in the next hour or so. Will reply back tonight. so in the mean time, quit ****in on Andre's blarney stone and go write some more poetry...
whatever..
I greatly appreciate you sharing your knowledge on this particular amplifier!
it's just the kick in the ass I need to get mine working up to snuff.

--JRC
  #10  
Old January 19th 14, 01:41 AM posted to rec.audio.tubes
hugeshows
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Posts: 29
Default Restoring a Sherwood S-5000

Hey, cool I'm looking forward to it. Please upload some pics if you can, if you need a place to put them, PM me and I'll share my dropbox folder with you.

Cheers,

-forkinthesocket


On Saturday, January 18, 2014 8:25:17 PM UTC-5, wrote:
> ha.. wow.
>
> Hey forkinthesocket..
>
> I finally got my Sherwood, multimeter and a glass of SOCO in the same room.. and my wife and kid in another room! Gonna be taking those measurements in the next hour or so. Will reply back tonight. so in the mean time, quit ****in on Andre's blarney stone and go write some more poetry...
>
> whatever..
>
> I greatly appreciate you sharing your knowledge on this particular amplifier!
>
> it's just the kick in the ass I need to get mine working up to snuff.
>
>
>
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