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  #11  
Old September 7th 20, 05:15 AM posted to rec.audio.pro
Trevor
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Posts: 2,797
Default Impulse responce

On 7/09/2020 9:40 am, cedricl wrote:
> On Sunday, September 6, 2020 at 2:19:36 PM UTC-7, Scott Dorsey wrote:
>> cedricl wrote:
>>> Playing around with importing impulse response files into a convolution reverb. They want to be split stereo .wav files. My files are .aiff files. What will convert .aiff files to split stereo .wav files?

>> If you don't have sox installed, install it. It makes life MUCH easier for
>> doing small conversion tasks like this.
>> --scott


> Maybe I won't use sox. I'm pretty good with your basic DAW. Wasn't looking at learning command line language for converting audio.


Not wanting to sound mean, but anybody "pretty good with your basic DAW"
would have done this in 10 seconds already, and never needed to ask here
surely?

Ads
  #12  
Old September 7th 20, 01:16 PM posted to rec.audio.pro
Scott Dorsey
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Posts: 16,750
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cedricl > wrote:
>I'll look for sox. Is it a Mac app too? Thanks.


It's straight C with no clunky gui, so it builds on just about any system
including mac.

It's an absolute lifesaver. It will join, split, and do format conversions.
The sample rate converter is acceptable.

I recently had a couple hundred .wav files that were recorded with split
channels because that was the default on the Tascam recorder. One command
turns them all into stereo wav files. Another command creates normalized
mp3 encoded versions for bands to audition. So much easier than having
to do it all one at a time in the daw.
--scott

--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
  #13  
Old September 7th 20, 01:17 PM posted to rec.audio.pro
Scott Dorsey
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Posts: 16,750
Default Impulse responce

cedricl > wrote:
>Maybe I won't use sox. I'm pretty good with your basic DAW. Wasn't looking at learning command line language for converting audio.


Well, do it in the daw, then, it should not be too difficult. But it's a lot
faster to do it on the command line, and if you don't know how to use the
command line you are missing out on 90% of the capability of the mac.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
  #14  
Old September 7th 20, 01:37 PM posted to rec.audio.pro
John Williamson
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Posts: 1,701
Default Impulse responce

On 07/09/2020 13:17, Scott Dorsey wrote:
> cedricl > wrote:
>> Maybe I won't use sox. I'm pretty good with your basic DAW. Wasn't looking at learning command line language for converting audio.

>
> Well, do it in the daw, then, it should not be too difficult. But it's a lot
> faster to do it on the command line, and if you don't know how to use the
> command line you are missing out on 90% of the capability of the mac.
> --scott
>

Which is ironic, bearing in mind that the Apple computers originally
only came to be in their position as leaders in the arts due to their
superior WIMP interface. IBM were stuck in text mode at the time.

--
Tciao for Now!

John.
  #15  
Old September 7th 20, 10:30 PM posted to rec.audio.pro
geoff
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On 8/09/2020 12:16 am, Scott Dorsey wrote:
> cedricl > wrote:
>> I'll look for sox. Is it a Mac app too? Thanks.

>
> It's straight C with no clunky gui, so it builds on just about any system
> including mac.
>
> It's an absolute lifesaver. It will join, split, and do format conversions.
> The sample rate converter is acceptable.
>
> I recently had a couple hundred .wav files that were recorded with split
> channels because that was the default on the Tascam recorder. One command
> turns them all into stereo wav files. Another command creates normalized
> mp3 encoded versions for bands to audition. So much easier than having
> to do it all one at a time in the daw.
> --scott
>


About as easy as a script in Sound Forge then.\

geoff
  #16  
Old September 8th 20, 02:45 AM posted to rec.audio.pro
Trevor
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Posts: 2,797
Default Impulse responce

On 8/09/2020 7:30 am, geoff wrote:
> On 8/09/2020 12:16 am, Scott Dorsey wrote:
>> cedricl¬* > wrote:
>>> I'll look for sox. Is it a Mac app too? Thanks.

>>
>> It's straight C with no clunky gui, so it builds on just about any system
>> including mac.
>>
>> It's an absolute lifesaver.¬* It will join, split, and do format
>> conversions.
>> The sample rate converter is acceptable.
>>
>> I recently had a couple hundred .wav files that were recorded with split
>> channels because that was the default on the Tascam recorder.¬* One
>> command
>> turns them all into stereo wav files.¬* Another command creates normalized
>> mp3 encoded versions for bands to audition.¬* So much easier than having
>> to do it all one at a time in the daw.
>> --scott
>>

>
> About as easy as a script in Sound Forge then.\



Beat me to it. Any good DAW has macro's/scripts/actions. Whatever you
are familiar with is often easiest. But I'd compare actual results
before choosing any method.




  #17  
Old September 8th 20, 01:29 PM posted to rec.audio.pro
Scott Dorsey
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Posts: 16,750
Default Impulse responce

geoff > wrote:
>On 8/09/2020 12:16 am, Scott Dorsey wrote:
>> cedricl > wrote:
>>> I'll look for sox. Is it a Mac app too? Thanks.

>>
>> It's straight C with no clunky gui, so it builds on just about any system
>> including mac.
>>
>> It's an absolute lifesaver. It will join, split, and do format conversions.
>> The sample rate converter is acceptable.
>>
>> I recently had a couple hundred .wav files that were recorded with split
>> channels because that was the default on the Tascam recorder. One command
>> turns them all into stereo wav files. Another command creates normalized
>> mp3 encoded versions for bands to audition. So much easier than having
>> to do it all one at a time in the daw.

>
>About as easy as a script in Sound Forge then.\


Pretty much the same, except not proprietary. A lot of DAWs have scripting
languages built into them because the underlying operating system has fallen
down on the job.
--scott

--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
  #18  
Old September 8th 20, 10:56 PM posted to rec.audio.pro
geoff
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Posts: 1,673
Default Impulse responce

On 9/09/2020 12:29 am, Scott Dorsey wrote:
> geoff > wrote:
>> On 8/09/2020 12:16 am, Scott Dorsey wrote:
>>> cedricl > wrote:
>>>> I'll look for sox. Is it a Mac app too? Thanks.
>>>
>>> It's straight C with no clunky gui, so it builds on just about any system
>>> including mac.
>>>
>>> It's an absolute lifesaver. It will join, split, and do format conversions.
>>> The sample rate converter is acceptable.
>>>
>>> I recently had a couple hundred .wav files that were recorded with split
>>> channels because that was the default on the Tascam recorder. One command
>>> turns them all into stereo wav files. Another command creates normalized
>>> mp3 encoded versions for bands to audition. So much easier than having
>>> to do it all one at a time in the daw.

>>
>> About as easy as a script in Sound Forge then.\

>
> Pretty much the same, except not proprietary. A lot of DAWs have scripting
> languages built into them because the underlying operating system has fallen
> down on the job.
> --scott
>


No. Scripting functions built into them in order to use the applications
own propriety functions using its own code, and that of hosted plugins.

Of course one could exit to an OS command line to do all sorts of things
if they were implemented, but if a dedicated fundamentalist and you
could do everything that way in the OS itself, what would be the point
of having applications ?

geoff



  #19  
Old September 9th 20, 12:03 AM posted to rec.audio.pro
Scott Dorsey
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Posts: 16,750
Default Impulse responce

geoff > wrote:
>On 9/09/2020 12:29 am, Scott Dorsey wrote:
>>>
>>> About as easy as a script in Sound Forge then.\

>>
>> Pretty much the same, except not proprietary. A lot of DAWs have scripting
>> languages built into them because the underlying operating system has fallen
>> down on the job.

>
>No. Scripting functions built into them in order to use the applications
>own propriety functions using its own code, and that of hosted plugins.
>
>Of course one could exit to an OS command line to do all sorts of things
>if they were implemented, but if a dedicated fundamentalist and you
>could do everything that way in the OS itself, what would be the point
>of having applications ?


That's what sox is, it's an application that does simple tasks. The point
of the Software Tools environment is to have small applications that can
be chained together to do very powerful things.

Not all of those applications are part of the OS, many of them are things you
add and you run from the OS.

So you use sox -called by- a script in the operating system. You can actually
operate some all-in-one DAW packages that way too, although it feels like an
afterthought on most of them today.
--scott

--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
  #20  
Old September 9th 20, 12:08 AM posted to rec.audio.pro
geoff
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Posts: 1,673
Default Impulse responce

On 9/09/2020 11:03 am, Scott Dorsey wrote:
> geoff > wrote:
>> On 9/09/2020 12:29 am, Scott Dorsey wrote:
>>>>
>>>> About as easy as a script in Sound Forge then.\
>>>
>>> Pretty much the same, except not proprietary. A lot of DAWs have scripting
>>> languages built into them because the underlying operating system has fallen
>>> down on the job.

>>
>> No. Scripting functions built into them in order to use the applications
>> own propriety functions using its own code, and that of hosted plugins.
>>
>> Of course one could exit to an OS command line to do all sorts of things
>> if they were implemented, but if a dedicated fundamentalist and you
>> could do everything that way in the OS itself, what would be the point
>> of having applications ?

>
> That's what sox is, it's an application that does simple tasks. The point
> of the Software Tools environment is to have small applications that can
> be chained together to do very powerful things.
>
> Not all of those applications are part of the OS, many of them are things you
> add and you run from the OS.
>
> So you use sox -called by- a script in the operating system. You can actually
> operate some all-in-one DAW packages that way too, although it feels like an
> afterthought on most of them today.
> --scott
>


Beats me as to *why* one would prefer that option for anything but the
simplest of one-off transactions n- unless blind and relying on a
text-to-speech (and vice-versa) interface.

And I grew up on command lines. And 6800 machine code before that.

geoff
 




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