A Audio and hi-fi forum. AudioBanter

Go Back   Home » AudioBanter forum » rec.audio » Pro Audio
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

What is the "stereo angle'?



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old August 1st 07, 05:29 PM posted to rec.audio.pro
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default What is the "stereo angle'?

Quite often, when discussing a stereo mike setup, there is reference to the
stereo angle. Just what is the definition of the stereo angle, and how is
it defined mathematically?

Thanks,

Norm Strong


Ads
  #2  
Old August 1st 07, 07:04 PM posted to rec.audio.pro
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default What is the "stereo angle'?

On Aug 1, 12:29 pm, > wrote:
> Quite often, when discussing a stereo mike setup, there is reference to the
> stereo angle. Just what is the definition of the stereo angle, and how is
> it defined mathematically?
>
> Thanks,
>
> Norm Strong


Hey Norm...

This is off the top of my head and it's been a while since the 'books'
BUT I believe you may be looking at one of three numbers depending on
what question you are truly trying to answer...

so here are my takes....

1. stereo angle of a 'co-incident pair' of mics.... 90 degrees (mic
diaphrams nearly touching but perpendicular to eachother while
capsules remain on the same plane... you can find illustrations of
this online)

2. in an ORTF position... think like you're placing your microphones
like your ears work spaced about 8'' apart (17 cm??) and the stereo
angle is 110 degrees I believe... (look up ORTF I'm sure its on the
web)

and 3. (this has nothing to do with mic'ing... ) I suppose you could
be talking about proper stereo placement for nearfield monitors???
which generally speaking is a equilateral triangle with your HEAD
being the third 'point' of your triangle... (technically that would be
60 degree inner angles of a equilateral triangle)

hope this is what you were looking for... take care Norm.

Troy Bourne

  #3  
Old August 2nd 07, 05:45 PM posted to rec.audio.pro
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default What is the "stereo angle'?


"Soundhaspriority" > wrote in message
...
>
> > wrote in message
> . ..
>> Quite often, when discussing a stereo mike setup, there is reference to
>> the stereo angle. Just what is the definition of the stereo angle, and
>> how is it defined mathematically?
>>
>> Thanks,
>>
>> Norm Strong

> Norm, this higly regarded paper gives it all to you:
> http://www.rycote.com/products/pdf/T...nic%20Zoom.pdf
>
> Regards,
> Bob Morein
> Dresher, PA
> (215) 646-4894



Perfect! Thank you, Bob

Norm


  #4  
Old August 5th 07, 02:06 PM posted to rec.audio.pro
David Satz
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 116
Default What is the "stereo angle'?

Norm, I assume you mean what Prof. Michael Williams calls the
"stereophonic recording angle" of a microphone setup. This is the
angle in the real-world recording situation which will just--more or
less exactly--seem to fill the span between two loudspeakers in
playback.

This angle varies considerably among different stereo microphone
arrangements. The ideal is to find a combination of miking distance
and (by selection of an appropriate setup) stereophonic recording
angle which will translate the actual angular width of whatever you're
recording into the angular width that you want in playback.

That doesn't mean that you always want to fill the distance between
the speakers completely. "The violin that ate New York" can be a
rather distracting effect, but it is also sad when most of the direct
sound sources in a recording seem to come from within a small range of
angles near to the center, as so often occurs when X/Y cardioids are
used by those who believe that 90 degrees is the ideal angle to set
between them. (It actually gives some enormously wide stereophonic
recording angle; the result is halfway between stereo and mono.)

At any rate, Williams' (and others') work can greatly reduce the
amount of trial and error that are needed when deciding on a
microphone setup for most simple stereo recording techniques. Once you
learn how to use his charts, they offer the big, previously missing
pieces of information for a lot of people. Highly recommended.

--best regards

  #5  
Old August 8th 07, 10:12 PM posted to rec.audio.pro
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default What is the "stereo angle'?


"David Satz" > wrote in message
ups.com...
> Norm, I assume you mean what Prof. Michael Williams calls the
> "stereophonic recording angle" of a microphone setup. This is the
> angle in the real-world recording situation which will just--more or
> less exactly--seem to fill the span between two loudspeakers in
> playback.
>
> This angle varies considerably among different stereo microphone
> arrangements. The ideal is to find a combination of miking distance
> and (by selection of an appropriate setup) stereophonic recording
> angle which will translate the actual angular width of whatever you're
> recording into the angular width that you want in playback.
>
> That doesn't mean that you always want to fill the distance between
> the speakers completely. "The violin that ate New York" can be a
> rather distracting effect, but it is also sad when most of the direct
> sound sources in a recording seem to come from within a small range of
> angles near to the center, as so often occurs when X/Y cardioids are
> used by those who believe that 90 degrees is the ideal angle to set
> between them. (It actually gives some enormously wide stereophonic
> recording angle; the result is halfway between stereo and mono.)
>
> At any rate, Williams' (and others') work can greatly reduce the
> amount of trial and error that are needed when deciding on a
> microphone setup for most simple stereo recording techniques. Once you
> learn how to use his charts, they offer the big, previously missing
> pieces of information for a lot of people. Highly recommended.


It's an excellent article, and it answers all my questions more than
adequately. I read an article by Bruce Babbit not too long ago in which he
shows experimental results of the apparent separation of 5 sound sources
compared to the actual separation of the same sources when recorded. I
guess the object is to make the recording sound as much like the original as
possible. It's interesting to note than the best results were obtained with
an ORTF placement having an angle of 110 degrees and a spacing of 17cm.

Also, the Sennheiser brochure for the MKH series has a short discussion of
stereo angles on the back 2 pages.

Thanks for your help.

Norm


  #6  
Old August 9th 07, 07:35 AM posted to rec.audio.pro
Paul Stamler
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,614
Default What is the "stereo angle'?

> wrote in message
. ..

> It's an excellent article, and it answers all my questions more than
> adequately. I read an article by Bruce Babbit not too long ago in which

he
> shows experimental results of the apparent separation of 5 sound sources
> compared to the actual separation of the same sources when recorded. I
> guess the object is to make the recording sound as much like the original

as
> possible. It's interesting to note than the best results were obtained

with
> an ORTF placement having an angle of 110 degrees and a spacing of 17cm.


Gee, the AES ran a similar article in the 1970s. I don't think it was by
Babbit but I could be wrong. Anyway, that one gave good marks to the ORTF
setup, also Blumlein (stacked figure-8s at 90 degrees).

Peace,
Paul


  #7  
Old August 11th 07, 08:53 PM posted to rec.audio.pro
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default What is the "stereo angle'?


"Paul Stamler" > wrote in message
...
> > wrote in message
> . ..
>
>> It's an excellent article, and it answers all my questions more than
>> adequately. I read an article by Bruce Babbit not too long ago in which

> he
>> shows experimental results of the apparent separation of 5 sound sources
>> compared to the actual separation of the same sources when recorded. I
>> guess the object is to make the recording sound as much like the original

> as
>> possible. It's interesting to note than the best results were obtained

> with
>> an ORTF placement having an angle of 110 degrees and a spacing of 17cm.

>
> Gee, the AES ran a similar article in the 1970s. I don't think it was by
> Babbit but I could be wrong. Anyway, that one gave good marks to the ORTF
> setup, also Blumlein (stacked figure-8s at 90 degrees).
>
> Peace,
> Paul


I screwed up the name. It was Bruce _Bartlett_, not babbit. And it was in
db magazine for December, 1979. (I guess I should have looked it up before
I posted.) :-)

Norm


 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Amp on 110 angle = fail? Mike Car Audio 4 February 12th 05 01:46 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 03:56 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2019 AudioBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.