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  #1  
Old July 29th 12, 12:59 AM posted to rec.audio.pro
[email protected]
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Default pro microphones

I'm in the process of writing a short essay for my music recording industry class, in which I need to describe the type of gear that I would use for a demo recording project. I was hoping I could get some suggestions for some types of microphones to propose in my paper. I need to name specific brands, and they need to be high end professional microphones, retailing at $2000 or more.

I need microphones for the following sources:

- Snare drum
- Kick drum
- Toms
- Drum overheads
- Vocal mic for a high pitch, screamo-style heavy metal singer

Your suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Thank you!
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  #2  
Old July 29th 12, 02:14 AM posted to rec.audio.pro
Mike Rivers
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Default pro microphones

On 7/28/2012 7:59 PM, wrote:

> I was hoping I could get some suggestions for
> some types of microphones to propose in my paper. I need
> to name specific brands, and they need to be high end
> professional microphones, retailing at $2000 or more.


What type of demo? What's the purpose? What's the budget for
recording the demo? Who's paying for it.

If it's of an unsigned artist attempting to get signed by a
label, they'll expect to hear essentially a finished
recording. You, who don't know doodlysquat about microphones
and are still in school have no business trying to record
such a demo. He needs to go to a professional studio with a
knowledgable engineer and producer. They may choose among
dozens of mics ranging in cost from (to be realistic) $100
to $3,000. They'll use what works best for the material
being recorded, and it may not be the same microphones for
every song.

If you're doing a demo to get a gig at a coffee house, you
can do it just fine with inexpensive microphones.

Get your instructor to better define your assignment, or
write your paper explaining why there's no single good answer.

On the other hand, if you just want a list of brands and
models, go to any pro dealer's web site and pick out as many
as you need in the $500 to $2,000 range. Nobody can disagree
with your choices on paper.

Another approach would be to look through a few issues of
Mix magazine for articles on sessions with famous bands. All
of them mention some microphones. That'll do.

Learn to do your own research. But first, learn what you
need to find out.

--
"Today's production equipment is IT based and cannot be
operated without a passing knowledge of computing, although
it seems that it can be operated without a passing knowledge
of audio." - John Watkinson

http://mikeriversaudio.wordpress.com - useful and
interesting audio stuff
  #3  
Old July 29th 12, 04:26 AM posted to rec.audio.pro
Scott Dorsey
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Posts: 16,715
Default pro microphones

> wrote:
> Your suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Thank you!


My suggestions would almost certainly be unpopular.

Pick up a couple copies of Mix magazine and look at any of the articles
about how particular albums were recorded. Pick an album you like. Try
picking the mikes they used.

I mean, I'd use a Sennheiser 441 on almost everything but it's not $2,000.
Not yet, anyway.
--scott

--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
  #4  
Old July 29th 12, 06:37 AM posted to rec.audio.pro
hank alrich
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Default pro microphones

Scott Dorsey > wrote:

> > wrote:
> > Your suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Thank you!

>
> My suggestions would almost certainly be unpopular.
>
> Pick up a couple copies of Mix magazine and look at any of the articles
> about how particular albums were recorded. Pick an album you like. Try
> picking the mikes they used.
>
> I mean, I'd use a Sennheiser 441 on almost everything but it's not $2,000.
> Not yet, anyway.
> --scott


I find the assignment as described outrageously stupid and irrelevant.
Is _this_ how youngsters are to be brought up to competence in audio
recording?

Any mic works for any source, for some value of "works". (Apologies to
Tonebarge.)

--
shut up and play your guitar * http://hankalrich.com/
http://www.youtube.com/walkinaymusic
http://www.sonicbids.com/HankandShaidri
  #5  
Old July 29th 12, 07:40 AM posted to rec.audio.pro
Richard Webb[_3_]
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Posts: 533
Default pro microphones



On Sat 2012-Jul-28 21:14, Mike Rivers writes:
>> I was hoping I could get some suggestions for
>> some types of microphones to propose in my paper. I need
>> to name specific brands, and they need to be high end

<snip remainder of poorly formed query>

> What type of demo? What's the purpose? What's the budget for
> recording the demo? Who's paying for it.

What sort of facility, room used, etcetera?

> If it's of an unsigned artist attempting to get signed by a label,
> they'll expect to hear essentially a finished
> recording. You, who don't know doodlysquat about microphones and
> are still in school have no business trying to record
> such a demo. He needs to go to a professional studio with a
> knowledgable engineer and producer. They may choose among
> dozens of mics ranging in cost from (to be realistic) $100
> to $3,000. They'll use what works best for the material
> being recorded, and it may not be the same microphones for
> every song.


IF this dude's going to audio school, he needs to be able to formulate his thoughts a little better, or that school isn't teaching him much.

dO Mike and I sound a little harsh here? Sorry about that,
but your question is very poorly formulated, and yes I know
it's for some sort of paper, but that whole thing's rather
vague. You'll have to do better if you want other than
sarcastic comments from us old dogs been doing this for
awhile.

> If you're doing a demo to get a gig at a coffee house, you
> can do it just fine with inexpensive microphones.


Yeah right, but we don't know waht this guy's doing. What
school is this? IF you're not any better equipped to
formulate your questions than that I don't think I'd want to hire you.

> Learn to do your own research. But first, learn what you
> need to find out.


Well said.


Regards,
Richard
--
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| Standard disclaimer: The views of this user are strictly his own.
  #6  
Old July 29th 12, 09:19 AM posted to rec.audio.pro
geoff
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Posts: 1,481
Default pro microphones

Richard Webb wrote:
>
> IF this dude's going to audio school, he needs to be able to
> formulate his thoughts a little better, or that school isn't teaching
> him much.


I'd try a different school. But if he hasn't already worked that out for
himself, then maybe it IS the right school ......


geoff


  #7  
Old July 29th 12, 10:04 AM posted to rec.audio.pro
Frank Stearns
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Default pro microphones

(Richard Webb) writes:

>On Sat 2012-Jul-28 21:14, Mike Rivers writes:
>>> I was hoping I could get some suggestions for
>>> some types of microphones to propose in my paper. I need
>>> to name specific brands, and they need to be high end

><snip remainder of poorly formed query>


>> What type of demo? What's the purpose? What's the budget for
>> recording the demo? Who's paying for it.

>What sort of facility, room used, etcetera?


>> If it's of an unsigned artist attempting to get signed by a label,
>> they'll expect to hear essentially a finished
>> recording. You, who don't know doodlysquat about microphones and
>> are still in school have no business trying to record
>> such a demo. He needs to go to a professional studio with a
>> knowledgable engineer and producer. They may choose among
>> dozens of mics ranging in cost from (to be realistic) $100
>> to $3,000. They'll use what works best for the material
>> being recorded, and it may not be the same microphones for
>> every song.


>IF this dude's going to audio school, he needs to be able to formulate his thoughts

a little better, or that school isn't teaching him much.

>dO Mike and I sound a little harsh here? Sorry about that,
>but your question is very poorly formulated, and yes I know
>it's for some sort of paper, but that whole thing's rather
>vague. You'll have to do better if you want other than
>sarcastic comments from us old dogs been doing this for
>awhile.


>> If you're doing a demo to get a gig at a coffee house, you
>> can do it just fine with inexpensive microphones.


>Yeah right, but we don't know waht this guy's doing. What
>school is this? IF you're not any better equipped to
>formulate your questions than that I don't think I'd want to hire you.


>> Learn to do your own research. But first, learn what you
>> need to find out.


>Well said.


+1 to all that's been said.

And, another grumpy old man here, but anyone getting into this racket needs to get
used to that in any event. (Even the nicest guys can get cranky when the client is
shelling out $5K+/hour for top players, say a string and horn section. They don't
want you, say, as a second engineer, fumbling around for an SD cardioide that didn't
match something on the list you remember from this exercise...

"Woe is me! I can't find any KM184s!"

"Hey, dip****! There're 12 Klaus-modified KM84s in the closet. Criminy!"


If the exercise truly is as stated, the I'm a little underwhelmed by the instructor.
It's largely meaningless without some kind of context.

If "background building" is the mission here (contrasted with actually having a
sense of which mic to use when), the better question might be:

"Study various manufacturer product lines. Do some research into what folks are
using/have used on a spread of sessions. For this paper, your clientele and projects
are likely to be X, and Y, while your equipment budget is Z. What products would you
be likely to put in your microphone locker and why? Defend your choices."

- extra credit to recast the clientele and projects; see how your locker contents
might (or might not) change.

- extra credit if you research the pros and cons of owning "vintage" microphones,
and discuss what you found out....

Frank
Mobile Audio

--
  #9  
Old July 29th 12, 07:35 PM posted to rec.audio.pro
Richard Webb[_3_]
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Posts: 533
Default pro microphones


On Sun 2012-Jul-29 05:04, Frank Stearns writes:
>>IF this dude's going to audio school, he needs to be able to formulate his
>> thoughts a little better, or that school isn't teaching him much.


<snip>
> And, another grumpy old man here, but anyone getting into this
> racket needs to get
> used to that in any event. (Even the nicest guys can get cranky when
> the client is
> shelling out $5K+/hour for top players, say a string and horn
> section. They don't
> want you, say, as a second engineer, fumbling around for an SD
> cardioide that didn't
> match something on the list you remember from this exercise...


What exercise? I haven't seen anything from the op which
would tell me that he's actually expected to have learned
anything, except how to parrot back what he's heard or read
maybe.

> "Woe is me! I can't find any KM184s!"

<rotflmao!!!>

> If the exercise truly is as stated, then I'm a little underwhelmed by
> the instructor.
> It's largely meaningless without some kind of context.

ME too. Please give us the instructor's name and the school you're attending so we know to give its graduates the bum's
rush when they come calling. IF we're all wet please
restate your query more coherently.

> If "background building" is the mission here (contrasted with
> actually having a sense of which mic to use when), the better
> question might be:


> "Study various manufacturer product lines. Do some research into
> what folks are using/have used on a spread of sessions. For this
> paper, your clientele and projects
> are likely to be X, and Y, while your equipment budget is Z. What
> products would you
> be likely to put in your microphone locker and why? Defend your
> choices."


Indeed! Such an exercise causes the student to actually
engage a few brain cells and learn a few things. An
exercise as stated by the original poster just sees if he
can parrot what he's read in some magazines and on the
internet.

> - extra credit to recast the clientele and projects; see how your
> locker contents
> might (or might not) change.


Indeed! IN fact, when I was first setting up for remote
truck a few years ago I went through a very similar
exercise, with an eye toward having to spend my own money.
Then additional factors I had to consider we

What might I be able to rent that isn't in my locker? oF
that which isn't available on the rental market how often
might I choose it?

What might sound reinforcement providers already have
available?

> - extra credit if you research the pros and cons of owning
> "vintage" microphones,
> and discuss what you found out....


Indeed, that would be a great student exercise for such a
course.


Regards,
Richard
.... Remote audio in the southland: See www.gatasound.com
--
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| Standard disclaimer: The views of this user are strictly his own.
  #10  
Old July 29th 12, 08:57 PM posted to rec.audio.pro
Luxey
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Posts: 616
Default pro microphones

недеља, 29. јул 2012. 05.26.38 UTC+2, Scott Dorsey је написао/ла:
> > wrote:
>
> > Your suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Thank you!

>
>
>
> My suggestions would almost certainly be unpopular.
>
>
>
> Pick up a couple copies of Mix magazine and look at any of the articles
>
> about how particular albums were recorded. Pick an album you like. Try
>
> picking the mikes they used.
>
>
>
> I mean, I'd use a Sennheiser 441 on almost everything but it's not $2,000..
>
> Not yet, anyway.
>
> --scott
>
>
>
> --
>
> "C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."


I'd do so if I had more than one. Once it get to $2000, I'll sell it and buy 20SM57s. Not realy.
 




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