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High Voltage Vs High Current Receivers



 
 
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  #1  
Old June 1st 04, 10:08 PM
theOutdoorMonkey
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Default High Voltage Vs High Current Receivers

Hi:


I have started shopping for a good quality receiver for my home
theater/ home audio needs. I have a multi room speaker setup so I am
looking at receiver that can handle my multi-room setup without having
to buy an additional amp.

I am trying to make sense out of the High Current Vs High Voltage
theory that I have been geting from high end stero sales stores. The
argument is that basically the high current system works better even
if its output per channel may be 75w/ch compared to low current high
power receiver that can put-out 120w/ch.
I have read an article on how stuff works that tends to suggest the
opposite and that really threw me off. please see this link.
http://science.howstuffworks.com/question501.htm
The article suggests that it is more efficient to generate power from
high voltage and lower current than the other way around.
The argument is that power generated from high current tends to be
consumed by the wires during transmission. I do not know if this
argument affects sound differently but i would appreciate anyone who
can shade some light on this.
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  #2  
Old June 2nd 04, 12:37 AM
DaveW
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Default

Inexpensive receivers use higher voltage to control the movement of the
cones in the speakers. This approach requires much less expensive
electrical hardware in the receiver, but also has less ability to TIGHTLY
control the cones' motions, thus leading to cone overshoot on demanding
notes, which gives bass it's bad flabby sound and midrange a bloated sound,
at louder volumes.
Expensive separate amplifiers use high current circuitry which is much more
expensive to produce, but which gives the ultimate in control and authoity
over the cones' movements and leads to the the most lifelike CLEAN sounding
music.

--
DaveW



"theOutdoorMonkey" > wrote in message
om...
> Hi:
>
>
> I have started shopping for a good quality receiver for my home
> theater/ home audio needs. I have a multi room speaker setup so I am
> looking at receiver that can handle my multi-room setup without having
> to buy an additional amp.
>
> I am trying to make sense out of the High Current Vs High Voltage
> theory that I have been geting from high end stero sales stores. The
> argument is that basically the high current system works better even
> if its output per channel may be 75w/ch compared to low current high
> power receiver that can put-out 120w/ch.
> I have read an article on how stuff works that tends to suggest the
> opposite and that really threw me off. please see this link.
> http://science.howstuffworks.com/question501.htm
> The article suggests that it is more efficient to generate power from
> high voltage and lower current than the other way around.
> The argument is that power generated from high current tends to be
> consumed by the wires during transmission. I do not know if this
> argument affects sound differently but i would appreciate anyone who
> can shade some light on this.



  #3  
Old June 2nd 04, 02:24 AM
SAIL LOCO
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Default

It's all a bunch of spin. It takes a certain amount of voltage AND current to
produce a certain wattage. Onkyo toots that their receivers are high current.
Try to find any spec. that shows that a 100w RMS Onkyo receiver puts out more
current than any other 100W RMS receiver. Onkyo can't prove it. Go into 10
Circuit City stores and get the Onkyo pitch and then ask the salesman to show
you how he knows that. All you'll get is a DUH....................
S/V Express 30 "Ringmaster"
"No shirt, no skirt, full service"
  #4  
Old June 2nd 04, 03:30 AM
TCS
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On Tue, 01 Jun 2004 23:37:32 GMT, DaveW > wrote:
>Inexpensive receivers use higher voltage to control the movement of the
>cones in the speakers. This approach requires much less expensive
>electrical hardware in the receiver, but also has less ability to TIGHTLY

<rubbish snipped>

Sheesh. Learn ohm's law before you make a fool of yourself again.

Lower voltage for a given load equates to lower wattage. There's no way around
it.
  #5  
Old June 2nd 04, 03:43 AM
OFFICIAL RAM BLUEBOOK VALUATION
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Default

On 2/6/04 9:37, in article [email protected]_s04, "DaveW"
> wrote:

> Expensive separate amplifiers use high current circuitry which is much more
> expensive to produce, but which gives the ultimate in control and authoity
> over the cones' movements and leads to the the most lifelike CLEAN sounding
> music.


Bull**** alert!



  #6  
Old June 4th 04, 08:08 AM
Tim Perry
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Default


"theOutdoorMonkey" > wrote in message
om...
> Hi:
>
>
> I have started shopping for a good quality receiver for my home
> theater/ home audio needs. I have a multi room speaker setup so I am
> looking at receiver that can handle my multi-room setup without having
> to buy an additional amp.
>


by the extra amp OR get a speaker switch



> I am trying to make sense out of the High Current Vs High Voltage
> theory that I have been geting from high end stero sales stores.


ignore it.

The
> argument is that basically the high current system works better even
> if its output per channel may be 75w/ch compared to low current high
> power receiver that can put-out 120w/ch.


if the load (speakers) is the same for both systems the 120 W amp when
turned to max will supply more current to the load then the 75 W amp when it
is turned to max output.



> I have read an article on how stuff works that tends to suggest the
> opposite and that really threw me off. please see this link.
> http://science.howstuffworks.com/question501.htm
> The article suggests that it is more efficient to generate power from
> high voltage and lower current than the other way around.


this is fine for the power grid and 70 volt PA type speaker systems. it will
just confuse the heck out of you if you try to relate it to home HI-FI

> The argument is that power generated from high current tends to be
> consumed by the wires during transmission.


not exactly... power losses in transmission lines are higher as current gets
higher therefore using high voltage enables the transfer of power to be
more efficient. current changes as the load changes.

with speakers your load is fixed and your transmission line (speaker wire)
resistance will be much less then the speakers nominal impedance.

I do not know if this
> argument affects sound differently but i would appreciate anyone who
> can shade some light on this.


i cant. when speakers shed light it means they caught on fire and will
probably need to be replaced.



 




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