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Explain me this



 
 
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  #1  
Old April 6th 04, 11:42 PM
Schizoid Man
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Default Explain me this

Religiosity is a very important attribute in contemporary America. The
Christian movement wields far more social, political and economic clout in
the United States than it does in European and other countries that are
Judeo-Christian in origin.

This also means that the United States is far more religious a nation than
most Europeans countries.

Therefore, I find it paradoxical then that the holiest day in the Christian
calendar, Easter, is recognized as a legal holiday in most countries with
the notable exception of the United States.

I lived in the United Kingdom and I remember always getting the Monday after
Easter (suitably called "Easter Monday") off. But that phrase seems is not
commonplace in this country.

Can somebody please explain this to me? Thank you in advance.


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  #2  
Old April 7th 04, 01:19 AM
Joseph Oberlander
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Default Explain me this



Schizoid Man wrote:

> Religiosity is a very important attribute in contemporary America. The
> Christian movement wields far more social, political and economic clout in
> the United States than it does in European and other countries that are
> Judeo-Christian in origin.


It's a small minority of fundamentalists that are determined to
bring us into a new golden age.(they seem to forget the part where
most everyone dies to get there)

> This also means that the United States is far more religious a nation than
> most Europeans countries.


Actually, it's not. Just that this small rogue element is currently
in power.

> I lived in the United Kingdom and I remember always getting the Monday after
> Easter (suitably called "Easter Monday") off. But that phrase seems is not
> commonplace in this country.


The U.K. has a state religion, that's why.

  #3  
Old April 7th 04, 07:59 AM
Rich Andrews.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Explain me this

"Schizoid Man" > wrote in news:c4vbns$fan$1
@geraldo.cc.utexas.edu:

> Religiosity is a very important attribute in contemporary America. The
> Christian movement wields far more social, political and economic clout

in
> the United States than it does in European and other countries that are
> Judeo-Christian in origin.
>
> This also means that the United States is far more religious a nation

than
> most Europeans countries.
>
> Therefore, I find it paradoxical then that the holiest day in the

Christian
> calendar, Easter, is recognized as a legal holiday in most countries

with
> the notable exception of the United States.
>
> I lived in the United Kingdom and I remember always getting the Monday

after
> Easter (suitably called "Easter Monday") off. But that phrase seems is

not
> commonplace in this country.
>
> Can somebody please explain this to me? Thank you in advance.
>
>
>


Wrong newsgroup pal.

Try alt.religion

r


--
Nothing beats the bandwidth of a station wagon filled with DLT tapes.


  #4  
Old April 8th 04, 03:03 AM
Michael McKelvy
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Explain me this


"Schizoid Man" > wrote in message
...
> Religiosity is a very important attribute in contemporary America. The
> Christian movement wields far more social, political and economic clout in
> the United States than it does in European and other countries that are
> Judeo-Christian in origin.
>
> This also means that the United States is far more religious a nation than
> most Europeans countries.
>
> Therefore, I find it paradoxical then that the holiest day in the

Christian
> calendar, Easter, is recognized as a legal holiday in most countries with
> the notable exception of the United States.
>
> I lived in the United Kingdom and I remember always getting the Monday

after
> Easter (suitably called "Easter Monday") off. But that phrase seems is not
> commonplace in this country.
>
> Can somebody please explain this to me? Thank you in advance.
>

While some may argue that Christmas is a religious holiday, it is not
recognized as such here officially. It is treated as a holiday in the sense
that many people take time off. We have no official state religious
holidays. The religious element in this country has far less influence than
you might think. The main effect is that if the religious right does not
vote, the GOP candidate does not have a good chance at winning.



  #5  
Old April 9th 04, 10:26 PM
Schizoid Man
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Explain me this


"Michael McKelvy" > wrote in message >
> "Schizoid Man" > wrote in message


> >

> While some may argue that Christmas is a religious holiday, it is not
> recognized as such here officially. It is treated as a holiday in the

sense
> that many people take time off. We have no official state religious
> holidays. The religious element in this country has far less influence

than
> you might think. The main effect is that if the religious right does not
> vote, the GOP candidate does not have a good chance at winning.



I beg to differ. A couple of weeks ago I was reading a headline in a
right-wing scandal sheet - aka The Drudge Report - that screamed "Kerry Not
Sure God On America's Side".

Elizabeth Bumiller of the New York Times asked Kerry: "President Bush has
said that freedom and fear have always been at war, and God is not neutral
between them. He's made quite clear in his speeches that he feels God is on
America's side.

"Is God on America's side?"

Kerry: Well, God will -- look, I think -- I believe in God, but I don't
believe, the way President Bush does, in invoking it all the time in that
way. I think it is -- we pray that God is on our side, and we pray hard. And
God has been on our side through most of our existence.

'nuff said.

There is no way anybody is getting elected to higher office without strongly
promoting his Christian faith and 'family values'. I've lived in this
country for 3 and a half years and even I know that.


  #6  
Old April 10th 04, 03:35 AM
Bruce J. Richman
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Explain me this

Schizoid Man wrote:


>"Michael McKelvy" > wrote in message >
>> "Schizoid Man" > wrote in message

>
>> >

>> While some may argue that Christmas is a religious holiday, it is not
>> recognized as such here officially. It is treated as a holiday in the

>sense
>> that many people take time off. We have no official state religious
>> holidays. The religious element in this country has far less influence

>than
>> you might think. The main effect is that if the religious right does not
>> vote, the GOP candidate does not have a good chance at winning.

>
>
>I beg to differ. A couple of weeks ago I was reading a headline in a
>right-wing scandal sheet - aka The Drudge Report - that screamed "Kerry Not
>Sure God On America's Side".
>
>Elizabeth Bumiller of the New York Times asked Kerry: "President Bush has
>said that freedom and fear have always been at war, and God is not neutral
>between them. He's made quite clear in his speeches that he feels God is on
>America's side.
>
>"Is God on America's side?"
>
>Kerry: Well, God will -- look, I think -- I believe in God, but I don't
>believe, the way President Bush does, in invoking it all the time in that
>way. I think it is -- we pray that God is on our side, and we pray hard. And
>God has been on our side through most of our existence.
>
>'nuff said.
>
>There is no way anybody is getting elected to higher office without strongly
>promoting his Christian faith and 'family values'. I've lived in this
>country for 3 and a half years and even I know that.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>


All of the candidates, as well as virtually all past presidents, have been
widely photographed at various religious appearances on the campaign trail. In
addition, it is pretty commonplace to have news reports of presidents and
candidates alike attending church services on Sundays. That said, I wouldn't
want to speculate on just how "religious:" each of them has been, other than to
say that they all have obviously not been shy about demonstrating that they are
men of faith.

Of course, it remains true that no non-Christian president has been elected in
the last century, at least. But I'm also reminded that at one time not *that*
long ago, it was widely felt that a Catholic could never be elected as
president. Kennedy overcame that precedent.

Also, if you want to define "getting elected to higher office" as including US
senators and state governors, then it is definitely *NOT* true that strongly
promoting one's Christian faith and "family values" is a prerequisite.



Bruce J. Richman



  #7  
Old April 11th 04, 12:43 AM
Michael McKelvy
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Explain me this


"Schizoid Man" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Michael McKelvy" > wrote in message >
> > "Schizoid Man" > wrote in message

>
> > >

> > While some may argue that Christmas is a religious holiday, it is not
> > recognized as such here officially. It is treated as a holiday in the

> sense
> > that many people take time off. We have no official state religious
> > holidays. The religious element in this country has far less influence

> than
> > you might think. The main effect is that if the religious right does

not
> > vote, the GOP candidate does not have a good chance at winning.

>
>
> I beg to differ. A couple of weeks ago I was reading a headline in a
> right-wing scandal sheet - aka The Drudge Report - that screamed "Kerry

Not
> Sure God On America's Side".
>
> Elizabeth Bumiller of the New York Times asked Kerry: "President Bush has
> said that freedom and fear have always been at war, and God is not neutral
> between them. He's made quite clear in his speeches that he feels God is

on
> America's side.
>
> "Is God on America's side?"
>
> Kerry: Well, God will -- look, I think -- I believe in God, but I don't
> believe, the way President Bush does, in invoking it all the time in that
> way. I think it is -- we pray that God is on our side, and we pray hard.

And
> God has been on our side through most of our existence.
>
> 'nuff said.
>

You're right, this proves Kerry can't speak without equivocating.

> There is no way anybody is getting elected to higher office without

strongly
> promoting his Christian faith and 'family values'. I've lived in this
> country for 3 and a half years and even I know that.
>

And has absolutely nothing to do with my comments.

Politicians must appeal to a broad range of people, most of whom espouse a
belief in God. That doesn't make this an very religious country and it
doesn't get rid of the separation of church and state.


 




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