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Multiple spaces in recordings



 
 
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  #71  
Old April 12th 19, 04:50 PM posted to rec.audio.pro
Scott Dorsey
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Default Multiple spaces in recordings

nickbatz > wrote:
>Scott wrote:
>
>> > And the sad part is this is how most people listen to music.

>
>On one hand yes, and it's even sadder that people don't just sit and listen to music - everything is louder, faster, brighter, and there's more of it at once.


I agree thoroughly. I remember record listening parties, where when a new
record came out everybody would gather at someone's house and we'd play the
whole new album through all the way and listen to it. This is something
that people don't do anymore.

>On the other hand, aren't you able to tune out the shortcomings of a playback system and just enjoy music while you're driving?


No, it distracts me severely from the road. I will listen to news in the
car sometimes but mostly have the radio turned off. I want to see who is
going to hit me.
--scott


--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
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  #72  
Old April 12th 19, 04:52 PM posted to rec.audio.pro
Scott Dorsey
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Default Multiple spaces in recordings

In article >, Trevor > wrote:
>On 11/04/2019 8:34 am, geoff wrote:
>> Yes sad indeed. And also that many have never heard a purely acoustic
>> performance - without microphones and PA speakers. And many don't even
>> realise that such musical expression exists !

>
>Even sadder when people claim listening to an acoustic performance in a
>good concert hall is nirvana, without ever acknowledging how different
>it sounds in the front row Vs the back row, somewhere in the middle, or
>the conductors position! And that's without comparing the same orchestra
>playing the same piece in a completely different hall.


But this is part of what is so great about acoustic performances! You can
sit where you want.

>I always laugh
>when people think there is some TRUE sound that must be obtained, rather
>than simply enjoy the music. Sometimes it's hard to enjoy if the sound
>is absolutely terrible, but much of the time it's just different.


Well, it's my job to worry about that sound. I get paid for it, so I tend
to take it seriously. I tend to like to sit in the balcony and like
recordings that sound that way, but a lot of producers want it to sound
much more forward. That's okay, I can accomodate them.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
  #73  
Old April 12th 19, 08:10 PM posted to rec.audio.pro
nickbatz
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Posts: 121
Default Multiple spaces in recordings

On Friday, April 12, 2019 at 8:27:27 AM UTC-7, Ty Ford wrote:
> a lot depends on how good the dope is...


Just don't smoke and vote.
  #74  
Old April 12th 19, 08:17 PM posted to rec.audio.pro
nickbatz
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Default Multiple spaces in recordings

On Friday, April 12, 2019 at 8:48:19 AM UTC-7, Scott Dorsey wrote:

> >Moreover, most people's ears have changed since sequencers came along, or e=
> >ven before that with click tracks. Nobody ever noticed that "Gone" (Miles/G=
> >il Evans Porgy and Bess) has a couple of clams and speeds up. Or "Chameleon=
> >" (Herbie Hancock of course) speeding up like crazy.

>
> Speeding up and slowing down is part of what can make music interesting,
> just like dynamics in amplitude. Not that it's always a good thing, but
> when it's good it's good.
> --scott


Absolutely.

I'm just saying that almost four decades of sequencers have changed how we hear music. "Perfect" performances were never possible before - no clams, perfect timing, intonation, dynamics...
  #75  
Old April 12th 19, 08:27 PM posted to rec.audio.pro
Adrian Tuddenham[_2_]
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Default Multiple spaces in recordings

Trevor > wrote:

> On 11/04/2019 8:34 am, geoff wrote:
> > Yes sad indeed. And also that many have never heard a purely acoustic
> > performance - without microphones and PA speakers. And many don't even
> > realise that such musical expression exists !

>
> Even sadder when people claim listening to an acoustic performance in a
> good concert hall is nirvana, without ever acknowledging how different
> it sounds in the front row Vs the back row, somewhere in the middle, or
> the conductors position! And that's without comparing the same orchestra
> playing the same piece in a completely different hall. I always laugh
> when people think there is some TRUE sound that must be obtained, rather
> than simply enjoy the music. Sometimes it's hard to enjoy if the sound
> is absolutely terrible, but much of the time it's just different.


I am currently rescuing some unique mono recordings of operatic and
orchestral broadcasts of the 1950s from nitrate discs, it is usually
possible to identify the location of the performance from the acoustics.


--
~ Adrian Tuddenham ~
(Remove the ".invalid"s and add ".co.uk" to reply)
www.poppyrecords.co.uk
  #76  
Old April 13th 19, 03:01 AM posted to rec.audio.pro
geoff
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Posts: 1,422
Default Multiple spaces in recordings

On 13/04/2019 7:17 AM, nickbatz wrote:
> On Friday, April 12, 2019 at 8:48:19 AM UTC-7, Scott Dorsey wrote:
>
>>> Moreover, most people's ears have changed since sequencers came along, or e=
>>> ven before that with click tracks. Nobody ever noticed that "Gone" (Miles/G=
>>> il Evans Porgy and Bess) has a couple of clams and speeds up. Or "Chameleon=
>>> " (Herbie Hancock of course) speeding up like crazy.

>>
>> Speeding up and slowing down is part of what can make music interesting,
>> just like dynamics in amplitude. Not that it's always a good thing, but
>> when it's good it's good.
>> --scott

>
> Absolutely.
>
> I'm just saying that almost four decades of sequencers have changed how we hear music. "Perfect" performances were never possible before - no clams, perfect timing, intonation, dynamics...
>



And click-tracks. I loath rigid time, unless extreme and unintentional.

geoff
  #77  
Old April 14th 19, 06:02 AM posted to rec.audio.pro
Trevor
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Posts: 2,737
Default Multiple spaces in recordings

On 13/04/2019 1:52 am, Scott Dorsey wrote:
> In article >, Trevor > wrote:
>> Even sadder when people claim listening to an acoustic performance in a
>> good concert hall is nirvana, without ever acknowledging how different
>> it sounds in the front row Vs the back row, somewhere in the middle, or
>> the conductors position! And that's without comparing the same orchestra
>> playing the same piece in a completely different hall.

>
> But this is part of what is so great about acoustic performances! You can
> sit where you want.


Well wherever you ticket (or job) allows you to sit. Often not in the
optimum position, especially if you think the conductors spot is the
best! (assuming you are not the conductor :-)
Then there is still the issue of which hall.


>> I always laugh
>> when people think there is some TRUE sound that must be obtained, rather
>> than simply enjoy the music. Sometimes it's hard to enjoy if the sound
>> is absolutely terrible, but much of the time it's just different.

>
> Well, it's my job to worry about that sound. I get paid for it, so I tend
> to take it seriously. I tend to like to sit in the balcony and like
> recordings that sound that way, but a lot of producers want it to sound
> much more forward. That's okay, I can accomodate them.


My job too, and I'm paid to accommodate them. For my personal listening
I prefer more forward than the balcony, so that's my point exactly.
Everyone has a different concept of what is optimum. Even musicians and
music professionals.





  #78  
Old April 14th 19, 12:54 PM posted to rec.audio.pro
Scott Dorsey
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Posts: 16,546
Default Multiple spaces in recordings

geoff > wrote:
>
>And click-tracks. I loath rigid time, unless extreme and unintentional.


Well, on the other hand, you need rigid time for dance music, and some
dancers might argue that rigid time was the whole point of music. And
if you think about it, a lot of baroque music really wants to be dance
music inside.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
 




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