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They don't make it like they used to ...



 
 
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  #31  
Old September 6th 19, 01:12 PM posted to rec.audio.pro
John Williamson
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Posts: 1,647
Default They don't make it like they used to ...

On 06/09/2019 12:59, geoff wrote:

> At best (or worst) the demonstrated image shows something moderately
> peak-limited. The peak limiting in that image is nothing close to what
> could be described as heavy, let alone hyper, and the degree of overall
> compression of individual musical elements cannot be discerned at all,
> except to clearly see that it is nowhere near what is a common envelope
> for today's hyper-compressed music.
>

I actually downloaded the mp3 file and listened to it. It is a fairly
standard recording style and quality for the genre and period. The
"limiting" sounded like tape saturation.

--
Tciao for Now!

John.
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  #32  
Old September 6th 19, 02:14 PM posted to rec.audio.pro
None
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Posts: 80
Default They don't make it like they used to ...

Prudence R. Theckhmaha wrote in message
...

> ... according to you and others here.


And you're still obsessing about one little detail of terminology that
seems to fill your entire tiny mind with dumb-****ery. You're still
obsessed with proving that you're "right", while actually proving that
you don't have a clue. You obviously have no intention of ever actually
learning what you're blubbering about. But I guess you'll keep blubbering
to remind everyone that you're an idiot and an asshole.

KSO. FCK, WAFA!

  #33  
Old September 8th 19, 10:57 PM posted to rec.audio.pro
Bob Olhsson
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Default They don't make it like they used to ...

The proverbial elephant in the room is that really good musicians haven't been assured of a middle-class living since the 1970s.

Another part of the story is that during WW2 the U.S. military provided lessons and instruments to thousands of people based on merit alone. We and Great Britain also hosted thousands of Europe's finest musicians who were fleeing the fascists. They played in our orchestras and taught our children music. My wife actually took her high school violin lessons from the former concertmaster of La Scala.

Unfortunately, music has turned into a hobby. There is as much talent as ever but not nearly as much performance experience.
  #34  
Old September 9th 19, 02:44 PM posted to rec.audio.pro
Scott Dorsey
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Default They don't make it like they used to ...

In article >,
Bob Olhsson > wrote:
>The proverbial elephant in the room is that really good musicians haven't b=
>een assured of a middle-class living since the 1970s.
>
>Another part of the story is that during WW2 the U.S. military provided les=
>sons and instruments to thousands of people based on merit alone. We and Gr=
>eat Britain also hosted thousands of Europe's finest musicians who were fle=
>eing the fascists. They played in our orchestras and taught our children mu=
>sic. My wife actually took her high school violin lessons from the former c=
>oncertmaster of La Scala.
>
>Unfortunately, music has turned into a hobby. There is as much talent as ev=
>er but not nearly as much performance experience.


I'd say it's worse than that, Bob.

There are high grade professional musicians making a good living, and there
are hobbyists. But there is nothing in-between, and when there is nothing
in-between there is no route for hobbyists to become high grade professionals.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
  #35  
Old September 10th 19, 03:09 PM posted to rec.audio.pro
Ty Ford[_2_]
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Posts: 67
Default They don't make it like they used to ...

> There are high grade professional musicians making a good living, and there
> are hobbyists. But there is nothing in-between, and when there is nothing
> in-between there is no route for hobbyists to become high grade professionals.
> --scott
> --
> "C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."


Scott, are you still in WIlliamsburg +/- 15%?

I don't know about you, but up here in Baltimore we have a thriving musician community that will probably never see a major stage. This also exists in DC and that group is even larger. This month I'll be seeing two local acts at Germano's in Little Italy. The Abbey Road Jazz Ensemble and Nate Najar's quartet. That's jazz of course, but there's plenty of others. Josh Christina is a major player with a four piece. You can not sit still when the band plays.

You guys sound like old fogies trapped in your rocking chairs or the two old guys in the balcony of the Muppets.

Best Regards,

Ty Ford
  #36  
Old September 10th 19, 04:15 PM posted to rec.audio.pro
Scott Dorsey
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Posts: 16,614
Default They don't make it like they used to ...

Ty Ford > wrote:
>
>I don't know about you, but up here in Baltimore we have a thriving musicia=
>n community that will probably never see a major stage. This also exists in=
> DC and that group is even larger. This month I'll be seeing two local acts=
> at Germano's in Little Italy. The Abbey Road Jazz Ensemble and Nate Najar'=
>s quartet. That's jazz of course, but there's plenty of others. Josh Christ=
>ina is a major player with a four piece. You can not sit still when the ban=
>d plays.


That's great! Are they making a living doing this or do they have day jobs?

>You guys sound like old fogies trapped in your rocking chairs or the two ol=
>d guys in the balcony of the Muppets.


Bob can be Waldorf if I can be Stadtler.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
  #37  
Old September 11th 19, 03:08 PM posted to rec.audio.pro
Ty Ford[_2_]
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Posts: 67
Default They don't make it like they used to ...

On Tuesday, September 10, 2019 at 11:15:43 AM UTC-4, Scott Dorsey wrote:
> Ty Ford > wrote:
> >
> >I don't know about you, but up here in Baltimore we have a thriving musicia=
> >n community that will probably never see a major stage. This also exists in=
> > DC and that group is even larger. This month I'll be seeing two local acts=
> > at Germano's in Little Italy. The Abbey Road Jazz Ensemble and Nate Najar'=
> >s quartet. That's jazz of course, but there's plenty of others. Josh Christ=
> >ina is a major player with a four piece. You can not sit still when the ban=
> >d plays.

>
> That's great! Are they making a living doing this or do they have day jobs?
>
> >You guys sound like old fogies trapped in your rocking chairs or the two ol=
> >d guys in the balcony of the Muppets.

>
> Bob can be Waldorf if I can be Stadtler.
> --scott
> --
> "C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."


The others may not, but Josh does. Please pardon the vertical video, but in this case it was the only way to capture the entire keyboard. We'll be headed out to the Ashland Cafe to see him (again) on Sept. 21st. You'll need to book at least a week in advance. Get there around 6:30. Get dinner. Enjoy the show. They normally do three sets.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2I4F1NipMGo

The Seldom Scene had day jobs, as I recall. It didn't seem to take away from their music.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Seldom_Scene

Here in Baltimore, among many bands, "The Stone Hill Allstars" stands above many for their original music. This CD is one I really like. https://www.divideandconquermusic.co...all-stars-away

Also....while I'm thinking about it, Germano's in Little Italy deserves a LOT of credit for booking live music upstairs. Scroll through the months.

http://germanospiattini.com/calendar-of-events/

Regards,

Ty Ford



  #38  
Old September 11th 19, 03:09 PM posted to rec.audio.pro
Ty Ford[_2_]
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Posts: 67
Default They don't make it like they used to ...

On Tuesday, September 10, 2019 at 11:15:43 AM UTC-4, Scott Dorsey wrote:
..
>
> Bob can be Waldorf if I can be Stadtler.
> --scott
> --
> "C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."


Hahahahaha!
  #39  
Old September 11th 19, 05:14 PM posted to rec.audio.pro
Bob Olhsson
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Posts: 18
Default They don't make it like they used to ...

"Original music" isn't what I'm talking about. I'm talking about high school kids in the 1950s and '60sgetting paid the equivalent of $500 in today's money every weekend EACH. As their so-called "cover" band became successful, they would slip some originals into their show. As they developed a "draw," assuming that happened, people would invest in their playing "on the road" to expand their fanbase and in a recording. With regional success came offers from record labels. If they failed, they still could earn $500 each a weekend playing covers and improving their skills.

This supported a vast talent pool because it didn't require being able to afford to play music like it does today. The best of the best is who we hear on records from that era. Today, it's more like the best of the rich who play music full time.
  #40  
Old September 12th 19, 02:44 PM posted to rec.audio.pro
Ty Ford[_2_]
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Posts: 67
Default They don't make it like they used to ...

On Wednesday, September 11, 2019 at 12:14:52 PM UTC-4, Bob Olhsson wrote:
> "Original music" isn't what I'm talking about. I'm talking about high school kids in the 1950s and '60sgetting paid the equivalent of $500 in today's money every weekend EACH. As their so-called "cover" band became successful, they would slip some originals into their show. As they developed a "draw," assuming that happened, people would invest in their playing "on the road" to expand their fanbase and in a recording. With regional success came offers from record labels. If they failed, they still could earn $500 each a weekend playing covers and improving their skills.
>
> This supported a vast talent pool because it didn't require being able to afford to play music like it does today. The best of the best is who we hear on records from that era. Today, it's more like the best of the rich who play music full time.


In the 1970's (and certainly in the 50s and 60s) most bands had to go to a recording studio to get anything decent.

We have plenty of week day and "weekend warrior" cover bands around Balt and DC; young and old er). Where are you, Bob?

"This supported a vast talent pool because it didn't require being able to afford to play music like it does today." I'm not sure what you mean by this, can you extrapolate, please?

Regards,

Ty Ford
 




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